Westward School

Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy

Last Updated September 2018

Next Review Date: September 2019

  

This policy will be reviewed at least annually with the proprietor and/or the nominated advisory board member for Child Protection, including an update and review of the effectiveness of procedures and their implementation.

At Westward School we recognise our moral and statutory responsibility to safeguard and promote the welfare of all pupils in the Main School, EYFS and the Westward Out of School Care facilities.

We make every effort to provide an environment in which children and adults feel safe, secure, valued and respected, and feel confident to talk if they are worried, believing they will be effectively listened to. 

The purpose of this policy is to provide staff, volunteers, the proprietors and nominated advisory board member for Child Protection with the framework they need in order to keep children safe and secure in our school. The policy also informs parents and carers how we will safeguard their children whilst they are in our care.

Key Personnel

 

The Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) is :  

Mrs Shelley Stevenson

 

Contact details: email: dsl@westwardschool.co.uk    Telephone: 01932 220911

 

The Deputy DSL is

Mrs Kelly Callaby

 

Contact details: email: dsl@westwardschool.co.uk     Telephone: 01932 220911

 

The Headteacher is:

Mrs Shelley Stevenson

 

Contact details: email: sstevenson@westwardschool.co.uk

Telephone: 01932 220911

 

The Nominated Advisory Board Member for Child Protection is:

Mr Johnnie Parkhurst

 

Contact details: jparkhurst@westwardschool.co.uk    Telephone: 01932 220911

 

The Proprietor is:

Mrs Patricia Townley

 

Contact details: patriciatownley@btinternet.com

 

 Terminology

Terminology

 

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is defined as:

• protecting children from maltreatment;

• preventing impairment of children's health and development;

• ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care;

• taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes.

 

Child Protection is a part of safeguarding and promoting welfare. It refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are likely to suffer, significant harm.

 

Early Help means the providing support as soon as additional needs and support emerge at any point in a child's life.

 

Staff refer to all those working for or on behalf of the school, full or part time, temporary or permanent, in either a paid or voluntary capacity.

 

Child(ren) includes everyone under the age of 18. On the whole, this will apply to pupils of our school; however the policy will extend to visiting children and students from other establishments.

 

Parents refer to birth parents and other adults who are in a parenting role, for example step-parents, foster carers and adoptive parents.

 

Social Care refers to Children's Services in the area in which the child is resident, unless a child is a Child Looked After then this will be the Children's Services in their home authority.

 

MASH refers to the Surrey Multi Agency Safeguarding Hub.

 

Introduction


This policy has been developed in accordance with the principles established by the Children Acts 1989 and 2004; the Education Act 2002, and in line with statutory guidance: 'Working Together to Safeguard Children' 2018, Revised Safeguarding Statutory Guidance 'Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families' 2000, 'What to do if You are Worried a Child is Being Abused' 2015. 

The policy also reflects, both statutory guidance 'Keeping Children Safe in Education' 2018 (KCSIE), and Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) procedures.

The proprietors take seriously their responsibility under section 175 of the Education Act 2002 to safeguard and promote the welfare of children; and to work together with other agencies to ensure there are robust arrangements within our school to identify, assess, and support those children who are suffering harm or at risk from suffering harm.

This policy applies to all members of staff, the proprietors and the nominated advisory board Member for Child Protection.

 

Guidance and documents referred to in this policy

Surrey Safeguarding Board protocols, guidance and procedures

Working Together to Safeguard Children (July 2018)

Keeping Children Safe in Education KCSIE (Sep 18)

Keeping Children Safe in Education (KCSIE) Part 1 and Annex A (Sep 2018)

The Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage  (April 2017)

Disqualification under the Childcare Act (Aug 18)

Children Missing Education (September 2016)

Mandatory Reporting of Female Genital Mutilation Procedural Information (Oct 2015)

Multi-agency Statutory Guidance on Female Genital Mutilation (April 2016)

Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales (July 2015)

Teacher Standards 2011 (updated 2013)

Information Sharing (March 2015)

What to do if you're worried a child is being abused (March 2015)

The Prevent Duty: Departmental advice for schools and childminders (June 2015)

The use of social media for on-line radicalisation (July 2015)

Child Sexual Exploitation Guidance (NSPCC)

Mental Health and Behaviour in Schools: Departmental advice 2016

Counselling in schools:a blue print for the future (Feb 2016)

Sexting in schools and colleges: Responding to incidents and safeguarding young people (UKCCIS 2016)

Child Sexual Exploitation Definition and a guide for practitioners, local leaders and decision makers working to protect children from child sexual exploitation (Feb 2017)

Surrey County Council Touch and the use of physical intervention when working with young people

Sexual violence and sexual harassment between children in schools and colleges (May 2018)

 

POLICY PRINCIPLES and values

The welfare of the child is paramount

 Maintain an attitude of "It could happen here".

Children have a right to feel safe and secure, they cannot learn effectively unless they do so.

All children have a right to be protected from harm and abuse.

All staff have a role in the prevention of harm and abuse and an equal responsibility to act immediately on any suspicion or disclosure that may indicate a child is at risk of harm, either in the school or in the community, taking into account contextual safeguarding, in accordance with statutory guidance.

We acknowledge that working in partnership with other agencies protects children and reduces risk and so will engage in partnership working to protect and safeguard children.

Whilst the school will work openly with parents as far as is possible, it reserves the right to contact Social Services or the police, without notifying parents if this is believed to be in the child's best interests.

 

POLICY AIMS

To demonstrate the school’s commitment with regard to safeguarding and child protection to pupils, parents and other partners.

 

To provide an environment in which children and young people feel safe, secure, valued and respected, and feel confident to, and know how to approach adults if they have difficulties, believing they will be effectively listened to.

 

To enable the school to effectively contribute to Early Help, assessments of need and support those children.

 

To provide robust school systems and procedures that is followed by all members of the school community in cases of suspected abuse.

  

To develop and promote effective working relationships with other agencies, in particular Early Help providers, the Police, Health and Social Care.

 

To ensure that all staff working within our school who have substantial access to children have been checked as to their suitability, including verification of their identity, qualifications, and a satisfactory DBS check (according to KCSIE guidance), and a single central record is kept for audit. (Refer to the Recruitment Policy for more detailed information)

We comply with the Disqualification under the Childcare Act 2006 guidance last updated in August 2018.

 

supporting children

 

We recognise that school may provide a safe place and the only stability in the lives of children who have been abused or who are at risk of harm.

 

We recognise that a child who is abused or witnesses abuse and/or violence may feel helpless and humiliated, may blame themselves, and find it difficult to develop and maintain a sense of worth.

 

We accept that research shows that the behaviour of a child in these circumstances may range from that which is perceived to be normal to aggressive or withdrawn.

 

Our school will support all children:

  • We will promote a caring, safe and positive environment within the school.
  • We will encourage self-esteem and self-assertiveness, through the curriculum and through positive relationships within the school community.
  • We will ensure children are taught to understand and manage risk through personal, health and economic (PSHE) education and Relationship and Sex Education (RSE) and through all aspects of school life. This includes online safety.
  • We will respond sympathetically to any requests for time out to deal with distress and anxiety.
  • We will offer details of helplines, counselling or other avenues of external support.
  • We will liaise and work in partnership with other support services and agencies involved in Early Help and the safeguarding of children.
  • We will notify Social Care immediately if there is a significant concern.
  • We will provide continuous support to a child about whom there have been concerns who leaves the school by ensuring that information is shared under confidential cover to the child’s new setting and ensure the school medical records are forwarded as a matter of priority and within statutory timescales.

 

PREVENTION AND PROTECTION

We recognise that the school plays a significant part in the prevention of harm to our children by providing pupils with good lines of communication with trusted adults, supportive friends and an ethos of protection.

 

The school will:

  • Establish and maintain an ethos where children feel safe and secure, are encouraged to talk and are always listened to. There are worry boxes located in each classroom and in areas such as the school office.
  • Include regular consultation with children e.g. through questionnaires, participation in anti-bullying activities, asking children to report whether they have had happy/sad lunchtimes/playtimes.
  • Ensure that all children know that there is and can access an adult in the school whom they can approach if they are worried or in difficulty.
  • Include safeguarding across the curriculum, including PSHE, opportunities which equip children with the skills they need to stay safe from harm and to know to whom they should turn for help. In particular this will include anti-bullying work, online-safety, accessing emergency services, road safety, pedestrian and cycle training. Also focused work in Year 6 to prepare for transition to Secondary school and more personal safety/independent travel.
  • Ensure all staff are aware of school guidance for their use of mobile technology as set out in the School Code of Conduct and have discussed safeguarding issues around the use of mobile technologies and their associated risks.

 

SAFE SCHOOL, SAFE STAFF

We will ensure that;

 

The school operates a safer recruitment procedure that includes statutory checks on staff suitability to work with children.

 

This will include appropriate disqualification under the Childcare Act 2006 checks to be carried out on relevant staff. Staff are covered by this legislation if they are employed or engaged to provide early years childcare (this covers the age range from birth until 1 September following a child’s fifth birthday, that is up to and including reception year) or later years childcare (this covers children above reception age but who have not attained the age of 8) in nursery, primary or secondary school settings, or if they are directly concerned with the management of such childcare.

 

Relevant staff will be reminded that if their circumstances change they must inform the school.

 

All staff receive information about the school’s safeguarding arrangements, the school’s safeguarding statement, staff behaviour policy (code of conduct), safeguarding and child protection policy, the role and names of the Designated Safeguarding Lead and their deputy, and Keeping Children Safe in Education part 1 and annex A.

 

All staff receive safeguarding and child protection training at induction in line with advice from Surrey Safeguarding Children's Board which is regularly updated and receive safeguarding and child protection updates (for example, via email, e-bulletins, e-learning modules and staff meetings), as required, but at least annually;

 

All members of staff are trained in and receive regular updates in online safety and reporting concerns.

 

All staff, the proprietor and any nominated child protection advisory board members have regular child protection awareness training, updated by the DSL as appropriate, to maintain their understanding of the signs and indicators of abuse;

 

The safeguarding and child protection policy is made available via the school website and that parents/carers are made aware of this policy.

 

All parents/carers are made aware of the responsibilities of staff members with regard to child protection procedures through the publication of the safeguarding and child protection policy, reference to it in the school's handbook and posters displayed throughout the school.

 

We provide a coordinated offer of Early Help when additional needs of children are identified and contributes to early help arrangements and inter-agency working and plans;

 

Our Visiting Speakers policy will seek to ensure the suitability of adults working with children on the school site at any time;

 

Community users organising activities for children are aware of the school’s Safeguarding and Child Protection policy, guidelines and procedures.

 

The name of the designated members of staff for child protection , the Designated Safeguarding Lead and deputy, are clearly advertised in the school with a statement explaining the school’s role in referring and monitoring cases of suspected abuse.

 

All staff will be given a copy of Part 1 and Annex A of Keeping Children Safe in Education 2018 and will sign to say they have read and understood it. This applies to the proprietor and nominated advisory board members in relation to part 2 of the same guidance.

 

Roles and Responsibilities

 

all school staff

 

All staff have a key role to play in identifying concerns early and in providing help for children. To achieve this we will:

 

Provide a safe environment in which children can learn.

 

Establish and maintain an environment where children feel secure, are encouraged to talk and are listened to.

 

Ensure children know that there are adults in the school who they can approach if they are worried or have concerns.

 

Plan opportunities within the curriculum for children to develop skills they need to assess and manage risk appropriately and keep themselves safe.

 

Attend training in order to be aware of and alert to the signs of abuse.

 

Maintain an attitude of "it could happen here" with regards to safeguarding.

 

Know how to respond to a pupil who discloses harm or abuse following training of 'Working together to Safeguard Children', and 'What to do if you are worried a child is being Abused' (2015).

 

Record their concerns if they are worried that a child is being abused and report these to the DSL immediately that day. If the DSL is not contactable immediately a Deputy DSL should be informed.

 

Be prepared to refer directly to MASH, and the police if appropriate, if there is a risk of significant harm and the DSL or their Deputy is not available.

 

Follow the allegations procedure if the disclosure is an allegation against a member of staff.

 

Follow the procedures set out by the Surrey Safeguarding Children's Board and take account of guidance issued by the Department for Education.

 

Provide support for children subject to Early Help, Child in Need or Child Protection that is in keeping with their plan.

 

Treat information with confidentiality but never promising to "keep a secret".

 

Notify the DSL or their Deputy of any child on a child protection plan or child on need who has unexplained absence.

 

Have an understanding of Early Help, and be prepared to identify and support children who may benefit from Early Help.

 

Will identify children who may benefit from Early Help, liaising with the DSL in the first instance. (Options may include managing support for the child internally via the schools pastoral support process or an Early Help assessment). In some circumstances it may be appropriate for a member of school staff to act as Lead Professional in Early Help cases. 

 

Liaise with other agencies that support pupils and provide Early Help.

 

Know who the DSL and Deputy DSL are and know how to contact them.

 

Have an awareness of the role of the DSL, the schools Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy, Behaviour Policy and Staff Code of Conduct, and procedures relating to the safeguarding response for children who go missing from education.

 

Be mindful that the Teacher Standards states that teachers should safeguard children's wellbeing and maintain public trust in the teaching profession as part of their professional duties.

 

Assist the proprietors, Nominated Advisory Board Member for Child Protection and the Headteacher in fulfilling their safeguarding responsibilities set out in legislation and statutory guidance.

 

  

THE HEADTEACHER WHO IS ALSO THE DSL WILL ENSURE THAT;

 In addition to the role and responsibility of all staff the Headteacher will ensure that:

 

The school fully contributes to inter-agency working in line with Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018 guidance.

 

The safeguarding and child protection policy and procedures are implemented and followed by all staff;

 

All staff are aware of the role of the designated safeguarding lead (DSL), including the identity of the DSL and any deputies.

 

Sufficient time, training, support, funding, resources, including cover arrangements where necessary, is allocated to the DSL to carry out their role effectively, including the provision of advice and support to school staff on child welfare and child protection matters, to take part in strategy discussions/meetings and other inter-agency meetings and/or support other staff to do so; and to contribute to the assessment of children.

 

Provide opportunities for a co-ordinated offer of Early Help when additional needs of children are identified.

 

Ensure Deputy DSL's are trained to the same standard as the DSL and the role is explicit in their job description.

 

With the designated safeguarding lead ensure adequate and appropriate cover arrangements are in place for any out of hours/out of term activities.

 

Where there is a safeguarding concern that the child’s wishes and feelings are taken into account when determining what action to take and what services to provide;

 

Child-centred systems and processes are in place for children to express their views and give feedback.

 

All staff feel able to raise concerns about poor or unsafe practice and that such concerns are handled sensitively and in accordance with the whistleblowing procedures;

 

That pupils are provided with opportunities throughout the curriculum to learn about safeguarding, including keeping themselves safe online;

 

Ensure that allegations or concerns against staff are dealt with in accordance with guidance from Department of Education (DfE), Surrey Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB) and Surrey County Council (SCC).

 

Ensure that statutory requirements are met to make a referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service and additionally in the case of teaching staff the Teacher Regulation Agency where they think an individual has engaged in conduct that harmed (or is likely to harm) a child; or if the person otherwise poses a risk of harm to a child.

 

THE DESIGNATED SAFEGUARDING LEAD

 

In addition to the role and responsibility of all staff the DSL will:

 

Hold the lead responsibility for safeguarding and child protection (including online safety) in the school, this responsibility is not able to be delegated.

 

Will have an "it could happen here" approach to safeguarding.

 

Will liaise with the local authority and work in partnership with other agencies in line with Working Together to Safeguard Children.

 

Will manage and submit a referral for a child if there are concerns about suspected harm or abuse, to the Surrey Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH), and act as a point of contact and support for school staff. Referrals should be made safe and securely by email to csmash@surreycc.gov.uk using the Multi Agency Referral Form (MARF) urgent referrals should be made by telephone 0300 470 9100.

 

Will refer cases to the Channel programme where there is a radicalisation concern via the MASH and act as a point of contact and support for staff to discuss concerns.

 

Will refer cases where a crime may have been committed to the Police as required.

 

Will liaise with the "case manager" and Local Authority "Designated Officer" for child protection concerns in cases which concern a member of staff or a volunteer; and refer cases where a person is dismissed or left service due to risk/harm to a child to the Disclosure and Barring Service and Teaching Regulation Agency, as required.

 

Will follow DfE and KCSIE guidance 'Peer on Peer Abuse' when a concern is raised that there is an allegation of a pupil abusing another pupil within the school.

 

Be available during term time (during school hours) for staff in school to discuss any safeguarding concerns. Appropriate and adequate cover arrangements will be arranged by the DSL and the school leadership team for any out of hours/term activities.

 

Acts as a source of support and expertise in carrying out safeguarding duties for the whole school community;

 

Will encourage and promote a culture of listening to children and taking account of their wishes and feelings, amongst all staff.

 

Will access training and support to ensure they have the knowledge and skills required to carry out the role. DSL training should be updated at least every two years and their knowledge and skills refreshed at regular intervals but at least annually.

 

Will have a secure working knowledge of SSCB procedures and understands the assessment process for providing Early Help and statutory intervention, including the local authority levels of need criteria and referral arrangements.  Contact the North East Early Help Referral Hub on 01372 833133.

 

Will have a clear understanding of access and referral to the local Early Help offer and will support and advise members of staff where Early Help intervention is appropriate.

 

Will understand and support the school delivery with regards to the requirements of the Prevent duty and provide advice and guidance to staff on protecting children from radicalisation.

 

Will liaise with school staff (especially pastoral support, behaviour leads, school health colleagues and the SENCO) on matters of safety and safeguarding and consult the SSCB Level of Need document to inform decision making and liaison with relevant agencies.

 

Will be alert to the specific needs of children in need, those with SEND and young carers.

 

Will understand the risks associated with online activity and be confident that they have the up to date knowledge and capability to keep children safe whilst online at school; in particular understand the additional risks that children with SEND face online and the associated and appropriate support they require.

 

Will keep detailed, accurate records (either written or using appropriate secure online software), that include all concerns about a child even if there is no need to make an immediate referral and the rationale for decisions made and action taken.

 

Will ensure that an indication of the existence of an additional child protection file is marked on the pupil school record.

 

Will ensure that when a pupil transfers school, their child protection file is passed to the new school as soon as possible, and within statutory timescales (separately from the main pupil file and ensuring secure transit) and that confirmation of receipt is received.

 

Will ensure that where a pupil transfers school and is on a child protection plan or is a child looked after, their information is passed to the new school immediately and that the child's social worker is informed. In addition consideration should be given to a multi-agency schools transition meeting if the case is complex and on-going.

 

Will ensure that a copy of the Child Protection file is retained until such time that the new school acknowledges receipt of the original file. The copy should then be securely destroyed.

 

Will ensure that all appropriate staff members have a working knowledge and understanding of their role in case conferences, core groups and other multi-agency planning meetings, to ensure that they attend and are able to effectively contribute when required to do so; where a report is required, this should be shared with the parents prior to the meeting.

 

Will report to the Headteacher any significant issues for example, use of the SSCB multi-agency escalation procedures, enquiries under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 and police investigations.

 

Will ensure that the case holding Social Worker is informed of any child currently with a child protection plan who is absent without explanation.

 

Will ensure that all staff sign to say that they have read, understood and agree to work within the School’s safeguarding and child protection policy, staff behaviour policy (code of conduct) and Keeping Children Safe in Education (KCSIE) Part 1 and Annex A and ensure that the policies are used effectively.

 

Will organise child protection and safeguarding induction, regularly updated training and a minimum of annual updates (including online safety) for all school staff, keep a record of attendance and address any absences.

 

Ensure that in collaboration with the school leadership team, nominated advisory board member for child protection and proprietors, the safeguarding and child protection policy is reviewed annually and the procedures and implementation are updated and reviewed regularly.

 

Ensure that the Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy is available publicly and that parents are aware that referrals about suspected harm and abuse will be made and the role of the school in this.

 

Establish and maintain links with the three safeguarding partners to make sure staff are aware of training opportunities and the latest policies on local safeguarding arrangements.

 

Will contribute to and provide, with the Headteacher, proprietors and Advisory Board member for Child Protection, the "Audit of Statutory Duties and Associated Responsibilities" to be submitted annually to the Surrey County Council, Education Safeguarding Team.

 

Will ensure that the name of the designated members of staff for Child Protection, the Designated Safeguarding Lead and deputies, are clearly advertised in the school, with a statement explaining the school's role in referring and monitoring cases of suspected abuse.

 

Meet all other responsibilities as set out for DSL's in Keeping Children Safe in Education 2018.

  

THE DEPUTY DESIGNATED SAFEGUARDING LEAD

 In addition to the role and responsibilities of all staff the Deputy DSL will:

 

Be trained to the same standard as the Designated Safeguarding Lead and the role is explicit in their job description.

 

Provide support and capacity to the DSL in carrying out delegated activities of the DSL; however, the lead responsibility of the DSL cannot be delegated.

 

In the absence of the DSL, carries out activities necessary to ensure the ongoing safety and protection of children. In the event of the long-term absence of the DSL the deputy will assume all of the functions above.

 

THE PROPRIETOR AND NOMINATED ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS UNDERSTAND AND FULFIL THEIR RESPONSIBILITIES, NAMELY TO ENSURE THAT;

 

The school has effective safeguarding policies and procedures including a Child Protection Policy, a Staff Behaviour Policy or Code of Conduct, a Behaviour Policy and a response to children who go missing from education. Ensure policies are consistent with Surrey Safeguarding Children's Board (SSCB) and statutory requirements, are reviewed annually and that the Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy is available on the school website.

 

The SSCB is informed in line with local requirements about the discharge of duties via the annual safeguarding audit.

 

That the school operates a safer recruitment procedure that includes statutory checks on staff suitability to work with children and disqualification by association regulations and by ensuring that there is at least one person on every recruitment panel who has completed safer recruitment training, if there is not a panel conducting interviews then the individual will have completed the safer recruitment training.

 

That at least one member has completed safer recruitment training to be repeated every five years.

 

Staff have been trained appropriately and this is updated in line with guidance and all staff have read Keeping Children Safe in Education (2018) part 1 and Annex A and that mechanisms are in place to assist staff in understanding and discharging their roles and responsibilities as set out in the guidance.

 

That all staff including temporary staff and volunteers are provided with the school’s safeguarding and child protection policy and staff code of conduct;

 

That the school has procedures for dealing with allegations of abuse against staff (including the headteacher), volunteers and against other children and that a referral is made to the DBS and/or Teaching Regulation Agency (as applicable) if a person in regulated activity has been dismissed or removed due to safeguarding concerns, or would have had they not resigned.

 

That a nominated Advisory Board member for safeguarding is identified.

  

A member of the senior leadership team has been appointed as the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) by the proprietor who will take lead responsibility for safeguarding and child protection and that the role is explicit in the role holder’s job description;

 

That on appointment, the DSL and deputy undertake inter-agency training (SSCB Modules 1& 2) and also undertake DSL ‘New to Role’ and ‘Update’ training every two years;

 

That children are taught about safeguarding (including online safety) as part of a broad and balanced curriculum covering relevant issues through personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE) and relationship and sex education (RSE).

 

That the school will comply with DfE and Surrey County Council Children Missing Education requirements.

 

That the school will comply with regular data returns requested by the Local Authority, regarding all pupils, of statutory school age, attending alternative provision and/or on a reduced or modified timetable.

 

That appropriate online filtering and monitoring systems are in place.

 

Enhanced and DBS checks (without barred list checks, unless the Nominated Advisory Board member is also a volunteer in the school) are in place for all members of the Advisory board.

 

That any weaknesses in safeguarding are remedied immediately.

  

Confidentiality

 

All matters relating to child protection will be treated as confidential and only shared as per the Information Sharing Advice for Practitioners (July 2018) guidance.

 

Information will be shared with staff within the school who 'need to know'.

 

All staff must be aware that they have a professional responsibility to share information with other agencies in order to safeguard children and that the Data Protection Act 1998 and General Data Protection Regulations are not a barrier to sharing information where the failure to do so would place a child at risk of harm. There is a lawful basis for child protection concerns to be shared with agencies who have a statutory duty for child protection.

 

All staff must be aware that they cannot promise a child to keep secrets which might compromise the child’s safety or wellbeing. However, staff are aware that matters relating to child protection and safeguarding are personal to children and families, in this respect they are confidential and the Headteacher or DSL’s will only disclose information about a child to other members of staff on a need to know basis.

 

All staff will always undertake to share our intentions to refer a child to Social Care with their parents/carers unless to do so could out the child at greater risk of harm, or impede a criminal investigation.



CHILD PROTECTION PROCEDURE 

 

At Westward we recognise our duty in relation to safeguarding issues outside of School hours and all correspondence will be read and acted upon 365 days a year.

 

 

The following procedures apply to all staff working in the school and will be covered by training to enable staff to understand their role and responsibility.

 

The  aim of our procedures is to provide a robust framework which enables staff to take appropriate action when they are concerned that a child is being harmed or abused or is at risk of harm or abuse.

 

The primary concern at all stages must be the interests and safety of the child. Where there is a conflict of interest between the child and an adult, the interests of the child will be paramount.

 

All staff are aware that very young children and those with disabilities, special needs or with language delay may be more likely to communicate concerns with behaviours rather than words. Additionally staff will question the cause of knocks and bumps in children who have limited mobility.

Please refer to the leaflet found in the staff room regarding 'bruising in children who are not independently mobile'.

 

Click to access the Surrey Safeguarding Children Board Procedures

For more information visit the Surrey Safeguarding Board website at http://www.surreyscb.org.uk/

 

Contact will be made with a welfare agency (Surrey Children's Services) within 24 hours of a disclosure or suspicion of abuse.

 

Accepted definitions of abuse fall into the following categories:

 

 

what is child abuse?

 

The following definitions are taken from Working Together to Safeguard Children HM Government (2018). In addition to these definitions, it should be understood that children can be abused by being sexually exploited, honour based violence, forced marriage or female genital mutilation. To support the local context, all staff have access to the Surrey Safeguarding Children's Board Levels of Need Threshold Document.

 

 

What is abuse and neglect?

 

Abuse and neglect are forms of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting, by those known to them or, more rarely, by a stranger. They may be abused by an adult or adults, or another child or children.

  

PHYSICAL ABUSE;

 

Physical abuse may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

 

emotional abuse

 

The persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause persistent adverse effects on the child's emotional development.

 

It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or 'making fun' of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children.

 

These may include interactions that are beyond a child's developmental capability, as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing a child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another.

 

It may involve serious bullying (including cyber-bullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, though it may occur in isolation.

 

SEXUAL ABUSE;

Involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening.

 

The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example, rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including online).

 

Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

 

neglect

 

Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child's basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child's health or development.

 

Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to:

  • provide adequate food, clothing or shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment);
  • protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger;
  • ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers)
  • ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.

It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child's basic emotional needs.

 

The SSCB Neglect strategy and the Neglect Risk Assessment Tool is available to provide more detailed information regarding neglect.

 

 Refer to Appendix 1 for more detailed information.

 

If a member of staff suspects abuse, spots signs or indicators of abuse, or they have a disclosure of abuse made to them they must:

 

 

1. Make an initial record of the information related to the concern.

2. Report it to the DSL immediately.

3. The DSL will consider if there is a requirement for immediate medical intervention, however urgent medical intervention should not be delayed if the DSL is not immediately available. 

4. Make an accurate record (which may be used in any subsequent court proceedings) as soon as possible and within 24 hours of the occurrence, of all that has happened, including details of:

 

• Dates and times of any observations

• Dates and times of any discussions in which they were involved

• Any injuries

• Explanations given by the child/adult

• Rationale for decision making and action taken

• Any actual words or phrases used by the child

(Forms and Body Maps can located in the staffroom)

5. The records must be signed and dated by the author or/equivalent on electronic based records

6. In the absence of the DSL or Deputy, staff must be prepared to refer directly to MASH (and the police if appropriate) if there is the potential for immediate significant harm.

 

Following a report of concerns the DSL must:

 

1. Using the SSCB Levels of Need, decide whether or not there is sufficient grounds for suspecting significant harm, in which cases a referral must be made to the MASH and the police if it is appropriate.

2. Normally the school should try to discuss any concerns about a child's welfare with the family and where possible to seek their agreement before making a referral to MASH. However, this should only be done when it will not place the child at increased risk or could impact a police investigation. The child's views should also be taken into account.

 

If there are grounds to suspect a child is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm or abuse the DSL must contact the MASH. By sending a Multi-Agency Referral Form (MARF) by email to csmash@surreycc.gov.uk or contact the MASH on 0300 470 9100. If a child is in immediate danger and urgent protective action is required, the Police (dial 999) must be called. The DSL must also notify MASH of the occurence and what action has been taken.

 

3. If the DSL feels unsure about whether a referral is necessary they can phone the MASH to discuss concerns.

4. If there is not a risk of significant harm, the DSL will either actively monitor the situation or consider the Early Help.

5. Where there are doubts or reservations about involving the child's family, the DSL should clarify with the MASH or the police whether the parents should be told about the referral and, if so, when and by whom. This is important in cases where the police may need to conduct a criminal investigation.

6. When a pupil is in need of urgent medical attention and there is suspicion of abuse the DSL or their Deputy should take the child to the accident and emergency unit at the nearest hospital, having first notified the MASH. The DSL should seek advice about what action the MASH will take and about informing the parents, remembering that parents should normally be informed that a child requires urgent hospital attention.

7. The exception to this process will be in those cases of known FGM where there is a mandatory responsibility for the teacher to report directly to the police. The DSL should also be made aware.

Child Protection Procedures Flowchart

 

 Flowchart for Raising Safeguarding Concerns About a Child

 

Dealing with disclosures

 

 All Staff

A member of staff who is approached by a child should listen positively and try to reassure them. They cannot promise complete confidentiality and should explain that they may need to pass information to other professionals to help keep the child or other children safe. The degree of confidentiality should always be governed by the need to protect the child.

 

Additional consideration needs to be given to children with communication difficulties and for those whose preferred language is not English. It is important to communicate with them in a way that is appropriate for their age, understanding and preference.

 

All staff should know who the DSL is and who to approach if the DSL is unavailable. All staff have a right to make a referral to MASH or Police directly and should do this if, for whatever reason, there are difficulties following the agreed protocol, for example, they are the only adult on the school premises at the time and have concerns about sending a child home.

Guiding Principles, the seven R's

Receive 

  • Listen to what is being said, without displaying shock or disbelief
  • Accept what is said and take it seriously
  • Make a note of what is said as soon as practicable

Reassure

  • Reassure the pupil, but only so far as is honest and reliable
  • Don't make promises you may not be able to keep e.g. 'I'll stay with you' or 'everything will be alright now' or 'I'll keep this confidential'
  • Do reassure, for example, you could say: 'I believe you', 'I am glad you came to me', 'I am sorry this has happened', 'We are going to do something together to get help'

Respond

  • Respond to the pupil only as far as is necessary for you to establish whether or not you need to refer this matter, but do not interrogate for full details
  • Do not ask 'leading' questions i.e. 'did he touch your private parts?' or 'did she hurt you?' Such questions may invalidate your evidence (and the child's) in any later prosecution in court
  • Do not ask the child why something happened
  • Do not criticise the alleged perpetrator; the pupil may care about him/her, and reconciliation may be possible
  • Do not ask the pupil to repeat it all for another member of staff. Explain what you have to do next and whom you have to talk to. Reassure the pupil that it will be a senior member of staff

Report

  • Share concerns with the DSL immediately
  • If you are not able to contact your DSL or the Deputy DSL, and the child is t risk of immediate harm, contact the MASH or Police, as appropriate directly
  • If you are dissatisfied with the level of response following your concerns, you should press for re-consideration

Record

  • If possible make some very brief notes at the time, and write them up as soon as possible
  • Keep your original notes on file
  • Record the date, time, place, persons present and noticeable non verbal behaviour, and words used by the child. If the child uses sexual 'pet' words, record the actual words used, rather than translating them into 'proper' words
  • If appropriate, complete a body map to indicate the position of any noticeable bruising
  • Record facts and observable things, rather than your 'interpretations' or 'assumptions'

Remember

  • Support the child:listen, reassure, and be available
  • Complete confidentiality is essential. Share your knowledge only with appropriate professional colleagues
  • Get some support for yourself if you need it

Review (Led by DSL)

  • Has the action taken provided good outcomes for the child?
  • Did the procedure work?
  • Were any deficiencies or weaknesses identified in the procedure? Have these been remedied?
  • Is further training required?

 

What Happens next?

It is important that concerns are followed up and it is everyone's responsibility to ensure that they are. The member of staff should be informed by the DSL what has happened following a report being made. If they do not receive information they should seek it out.

 

If they have concerns that the disclosure has not been acted upon appropriately they might inform the Headteacher or the Nominated Advisory Board member for Child Protection and/or make contact with the MASH.

 

Receiving a disclosure can be upsetting for the member of staff and schools should have a procedure for supporting them after a disclosure. This might include reassurance that they have followed procedure correctly and that their swift actions will enable allegations to be handled appropriately.

 

In some cases additional counselling might be needed and staff should be encouraged to recognise that disclosures can have an impact on their own emotions.

 

Remember anyone can make a referral.

 

Anti-Bullying/Cyberbullying

 

Our School Policy on anti-bullying is set out in a separate document and acknowledges that to allow or condone bullying may lead to consideration under child protection procedures.

 

We keep a record of known bullying incidents which is shared with and analysed by the Proprietor and/or members of the Advisory Board. All staff are aware that children with SEND and/or differences/perceived differences are more susceptible to being bullied/victims of child abuse.

 

When there is 'reasonable cause to suspect that a child is suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm' a bullying incident should be addressed as a child protection concern. If the anti-bullying procedures are seen to be ineffective, the headteacher/DSL and Deputy DSL will also consider child protection procedures.

 

PSHE education at Westward regularly provides opportunities for children to understand bullying is wrong, its impact and how to deal with it.

 

Racist Incidents

 

Our policy on racist incidents is set out separately, and acknowledges that repeated racist incidents or a single serious incident may lead to consideration under child protection procedures. We keep records of racist incidents.

 

Radicalisation and Extremism

 

The Prevent Duty for England and Wales (2015) under section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 places a duty on education and other children’s services to have due regard to the need to prevent people being drawn into terrorism.

 

Extremism is defined as ‘vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of the law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs’. We also include in our definition of extremism calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas.

 

Some children are at risk from being radicalised; adopting beliefs and engaging in activities which are harmful, criminal or dangerous. This can happen both online and offline.

 

Westward School is clear that exploitation of vulnerable children and radicalisation should be viewed as a safeguarding concern and follows the Department of Education guidance for schools and childcare providers on preventing children and young people from being drawn into terrorism.

 

Westward School seeks to protect children and young people against the messages of all violent extremism including but not restricted to, those linked to Islamist ideology, or to Far Right/Neo Nazi/ White Supremacist ideology, Irish Nationalist and Loyalist paramilitary groups, and extremist Animal Rights movements.

 

School staff receive training to help identify early signs of radicalisation and extremism.

 

Opportunities are provided in the curriculum to enable pupils to discuss issues of religion, ethnicity and culture and the school follows the DfE advice Promoting Fundamental British Values as part of SMSC (spiritual, moral, social and cultural education) in Schools (2014).

 

The Proprietor, members of the Advisory Board, the Headteacher and the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) assess the level of risk within the school and put actions in place to reduce that risk. Risk assessment may include, the use of the school premises by external agencies, anti-bullying policy and other issues specific to the school’s profile, community and philosophy.

 

When any member of staff has concerns that a pupil may be at risk of radicalisation or involvement in terrorism, they should speak to the DSL. They should then follow normal safeguarding procedures and refer cases to the MASH. If the matter is urgent then Surrey Police must be contacted by dialling 999. In non urgent cases where police advice is sought then dial 101 and ask to speak to the Surrey Police Prevent Coordinator.

 

The Department of Education has also set up a dedicated telephone helpline for staff to raise concerns around Prevent (0207 340 7264) or email counter-extremism@education.gsi.gov.uk. You can also contact the Police via the ACT (Action Counters Terrorism) number (0800 789 321).

 

Refer to Appendix 2 for more information



Domestic Abuse

 

Domestic abuse represents one quarter of all violent crime. It is actual or threatened physical, emotional, psychological or sexual abuse. It involves the use of power and control by one person over another. It occurs regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, age, religion, mental or physical ability. Domestic abuse can also involve other types of abuse.

 

We use the term domestic abuse to reflect that a number of abusive and controlling behaviours are involved beyond violence. Slapping, punching, kicking, bruising, rape, ridicule, constant criticism, threats, manipulation, sleep deprivation, social isolation, and other controlling behaviours all count as abuse.

 

Living in a home where domestic abuse takes place is harmful to children and can have a serious impact on their behaviour, wellbeing and understanding of healthy, positive relationships. Children who witness domestic abuse are at risk of significant harm and staff are alert to the signs and symptoms of a child suffering or witnessing domestic abuse. Staff undertake Domestic abuse e-learning training.

 

The School is enrolled onto the Operation Encompass scheme, a joint project between Surrey Police, Surrey County Council, Surrey Domestic Abuse Service and Surrey Schools; where every school day morning our DSL is notified of all domestic abuse incidents that have occurred and been reported to Police in the previous 24 hours which involved a pupil at this school (72 hours on a Monday morning). This provides an opportunity for us to ensure the right support is in place at the right time for our pupils who are experiencing domestic abuse. 

  

Refer to Appendix 3 for more information

 

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

 

Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse.

 

It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into sexual activity (a) in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or (b) for the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator or facilitator.

 

The victim may have been sexually exploited even if the sexual activity appears consensual.

 

Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can occur through the use of technology. All staff are aware of the link between online safety and vulnerability to CSE.

 

Any concerns that a child is being or is at risk of being sexually exploited should be passed without delay to the DSL.

 

Westward School is aware there is a clear link between regular non attendance at school and CSE. Staff should consider a child to be at potential CSE risk in the case of regular non-attendance and make reasonable enquiries with the child and parents to assess this risk.

 

The DSL will use the Surrey Safeguarding Children’s Board CSE Screening Tool alongside staff who know the child well on all occasions when there is a concern that a child is being or is at risk of being sexually exploited or where indicators have been observed that are consistent with a child who is being or who is at risk of being sexually exploited.

 

In all cases if the tool identified any level of concern (green, amber or red) the DSL should contact the Surrey MASH and email the completed CSE Screening Tool along with a Multi-Agency Referral Form (MARF). If a child is in immediate danger the police should be called on 999.

 

Westward School is aware that a child often is not able to recognise the coercive nature of the abuse and does not see themselves as a victim. As a consequence the child may resent what they perceive as interference by staff. However, staff must act on their concerns as they would for any other type of abuse. Children rarely  self-report CSE so staff must be particularly vigilant to potential risk indicators.

 

Westward School includes the risks of sexual exploitation in the PSHE and SRE curriculum. Pupils will be informed of the grooming process and how to protect themselves from people who may potentially be intent on causing harm. They will be supported in terms of recognising and assessing risk in relation to CSE, including online, and knowing how and where to get help.

 

Refer to Appendix 4 for more information

 

Child Criminal Exploitation and Gangs

 

There are a number of areas in which young people are put at risk by gang activity, both through participation in, and as victims of, gang violence which can be in relation to their peers or to a gang-involved adult in their household.

 

A child who is affected by gang activity or serious youth violence may have suffered, or may be likely to suffer, significant harm through physical, sexual and emotional abuse or neglect.

 

The risk or potential risk of harm to the child may be as a victim, a gang member or both - in relation to their peers or to a gang-involved adult in their household. Teenagers can be particularly vulnerable to recruitment into gangs and involvement in gang violence. This vulnerability may be exacerbated by risk factors in an individual's background, including violence in the family, involvement of siblings in gangs, poor educational attainment, or poverty or mental health problems.

 

Criminal exploitation of children is a typical feature of county lines criminal activity. Key identifying features of involvement in county lines are when children are missing, when the victim may have been trafficked for transporting drugs, a referral to the National Referral Mechanism should be considered with Social Care and Police colleagues.

 

A child who is affected by gang activity, criminal exploitation or serious youth violence can be at risk of significant harm through physical, sexual and emotional abuse. Girls may be particularly at risk of sexual exploitation.

 

Any concerns that a child is being or is at risk of being criminally exploited will be passed without delay to the DSL. The school is aware there is a clear link between regular non-attendance at school and exploitation. Staff will consider a child to be at potential risk in the case of regular non-attendance at school and make reasonable enquiries with the child and parents to assess this risk.

 

A referral to MASH will be made when any concern of harm to a child as a consequence of gang activity including child criminal exploitation becomes known. Any member of staff who has concerns that a child may be at risk of harm should immediately inform the DSL. The DSL will contact the MASH. If there is a concern about a child's immediate safety, the Police will be contacted on 999.

 

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

 

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is illegal in England and Wales under the FGM Act (2003). It is a form of child abuse and violence against women.A mandatory duty requires teachers to report 'known' cases of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in under 18's, which are identified in the course of their professional work, to the Police.

 

Local Police contact details can be found on the staff notice board.

 

The duty applies to all persons in Westward School who is employed or engaged to carry out 'teaching work' in the School, whether or not they have qualified teaching status. The duty applies to the individual who becomes aware of the case to make a report. It should not be transferred to the Designated Safeguarding Lead, however the DSL should be informed.

 

If a teacher is informed by a girl under 18 that an act of FGM has been carried out on her or a teacher observes physical signs which appear to show that an act of FGM has been carried out on a girl under 18 and they have no reason to believe the act was necessary for the girl's physical or mental health or for the purposes connected with labour or birth, the teacher should call 101 and make a report to the police force in which the girl resides. The report should be made by the close of the next working day.

 

All staff will undertake FGM training and are trained to be aware of risk indicators of FGM. Concerns about FGM outside of the mandatory reporting duty should be reported as per Westward School's child protection procedures. Staff should be particularly alert to suspicions or concerns expressed by female pupils about going on a long holiday during the summer vacation period. There should be consideration of potential risk to other girls in the family and practicing community.

 

Where there is risk to life or serious immediate harm the teacher should report the case immediately to the police, including dialling 999 if appropriate.

 

There are no circumstances in which a teacher or other member of staff should examine a girl.

 

Refer to Appendix 5 for more information

 

Forced Marriage

 

A forced marriage is a marriage in which one or both people do not (or in cases of people with learning disabilities cannot) consent to the marriage but are coerced into it. Coercion may include physical, psychological, financial, sexual and emotional pressure. It may also involve physical or sexual violence or abuse.

 

Forced marriage is an appalling and indefensible practice and is recognised in the UK as a form of violence against women and men, domestic/child abuse and a serious abuse of human rights. Since June 2014 forcing someone to marry has become a criminal offence in England and Wales under the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

 

A forced marriage is not the same as an arranged marriage which is common in several cultures. The families of both spouses take a leading role in arranging the marriage but the choice of whether or not to accept the arrangement remains with the prospective spouses.

 

School staff should never attempt to intervene directly as a school or through a third party. Contact should be made with the contact centre or the Forced Marriage Unit 200 7008 0151.

 

Honour-based Violence

 

Honour based violence (HBV) can be described as a collection of practices, which are used to control behaviour within families or other social groups to protect perceived cultural and religious beliefs and/or honour. Such violence can occur when perpetrators perceive that a relative has shamed the family and/or community by breaking their honour code.

 

Honour based violence might be committed against people who;

  • Become involved with a boyfriend or girlfriend from a different culture or religion;
  • Want to get out of an arranged marriage;
  • Want to get out of a forced marriage;
  • Wear clothes or take part in activities that might not be considered traditional within a particular culture.

It is a violation of human rights and may be a form of domestic and/or sexual abuse. There is no, and cannot be, honour or justification for abusing the human rights of others.

 

One Chance Rule

 

All staff are aware of the ‘One Chance Rule’ in relation to forced marriage, FGM and HBV. Staff recognise they may only have one chance to speak to a pupil who is a potential victim and have just one chance to save a life.

 

Westward School are aware that if the victim is not offered support following disclosure that the ‘One Chance’ opportunity may be lost. Therefore, all staff are aware of their responsibilities and obligations when they become aware of forced marriage, FGM and HBV cases.

 

Private Fostering Arrangements

 

A private fostering arrangement occurs when someone other than a parent or close relative cares for a child for a period of 28 days or more, with the agreement of the child’s parents. It applies to children under the age of 16 or 18 if the child is disabled. Children looked after by the local authority or who are placed in residential schools, children’s homes or hospitals are not considered to be privately fostered.

 

Private fostering occurs in all cultures, including British culture and children may be privately fostered at any age.

 

Westward School recognise that most privately fostered children remain safe and well but are aware that safeguarding concerns have been raised in some cases. Therefore, all staff are alert to possible safeguarding issues, including the possibility that the child has been trafficked into the country.

 

By law, a parent, private foster carer or other persons involved in making a private fostering arrangement must notify children’s services as soon as possible. However, where a member of staff becomes aware that a pupil may be in a private fostering arrangement they will raise this with the DSL and the DSL will notify Surrey Children’s Social Care of the circumstances.

 

Children Looked After

 

The most common reason for children becoming looked after is as a result of abuse and neglect.

 

The school ensures that staff have the necessary skills and understanding to keep looked after children safe. Appropriate staff have information about a child’s looked after legal status and care arrangements, including the level of authority delegated to the carer by the authority looking after the child and contact arrangements with birth parents or those with parental responsibility.

 

The designated teacher for children looked after will have the appropriate level training to equip them with the knowledge and skills to undertake their role.

 

The designated teacher for children looked after and the DSL have details of the child’s social worker and the name and contact details of the Surrey County Council’s Head of Virtual School.

 

The designated teacher for children looked after and children previously looked after will work in partnership with the Virtual School Assistant Headteacher to discuss how Pupil Premium Plus funding can be best used to support the progress of children looked after in the school and meet the needs of the child’s within their personal education plan.

 

Children Missing Education

 

 All children, regardless of their circumstances, are entitled to an efficient, full time education which is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have.

 

The school recognises that children missing education are at significant risk of underachieving, being victims of abuse and harm, exploitation or radicalisation, and becoming NEET (not in education, employment or training) later in life.

 

Where possible the school will hold more than one emergency contact number for each pupil.

 

The school will ensure that there is a record of joiners and leavers as defined in The Education (Pupil Registration) (England) 2006.

 

When removing a child’s name, the school will notify the Local Authority of: (a) the full name of the child, (b) the full name and address of any parent with whom the child normally resides, (c) at least one telephone number of the parent, (d) the child’s future address and destination school, if applicable, and (e) the ground in regulation 8 under which the child’s name is to be removed from the school register.

 

The school will make reasonable enquiries to establish the whereabouts of a child jointly with the Local Authority, before deleting the child’s name from the school register if the deletion is under regulation 8(1), sub-paragraphs (f) (iii) and (h) (iii)of The Education (Pupil Registration) (England) 2006.

 

The school will:

  • Enter pupils on the admissions register on the first day on which the school has agreed, or has been notified, that the pupil will attend the school.
  • Notify the Local Authority within five days of adding a child’s name to the admission register. The notification must include all the details contained in the admission register for the new pupil.
  • Monitor each child’s attendance through their daily register and follow the SCC procedure in cases of unauthorised absence.
  • Remove a child’s name from the admissions register on the date that the child leaves the school.
  • The school will notify the Local Authority when they are about to remove a child’s name from the school register under any of the fifteen grounds listed in the regulations, no later than the date that the child’s name is due to be removed.
  • Where parents notify the school, in writing, of their intention to electively home educate the school will forward a copy of the letter to the Elective Home Education Team / Education Welfare. Where parents orally indicate that they intend to withdraw their child to be home educated and no letter has been received, the school will not remove the child from roll and will notify Education Welfare at the earliest opportunity.

 

Pupils Missing Out On Education

 

The vast majority of children engage positively with school and attend regularly.  However, in order to flourish, some children require an alternative education offer or may require a modified timetable to support a return to full time education provision. It is recognised that children accessing alternative provision or a reduced or modified timetable may have additional vulnerabilities. Ofsted refer to these as Pupils Missing Out On Education (PMOOE), because they are not accessing their education in school in the ‘usual way’.

 

The school will gain consent (if required in statute) from parents to put in place alternative provision and/or a reduced or modified timetable

 

The school will ensure that and parents (and the local authority where the pupil has a statement of special educational needs) are given clear information about alternative provision placements and reduced or modified timetables: why, when, where, and how they will be reviewed;

 

The school will keep the placement and timetable under review and involve parents in the review. Reviews will be frequent enough to provide assurance that the off-site education and/or modified timetable is achieving its objectives and that the pupil is benefitting from it;

 

The school will monitor and track children attending alternative provision to ensure that the provision meets the needs of the child

 

The school will comply with regular data returns requested by the Local Authority, regarding all pupils, of statutory school age, attending alternative provision and/or on a reduced or modified timetable.

 

The school management team will report to the proprietors of any formal direction of a pupil to alternative provision to improve behaviour.

 

The senior management team will report to the proprietors information regarding the use and effectiveness of the use of alternative provision and modified timetables.

 

School Attendance and Behaviour

 

Additional policies and procedures are in place regarding school attendance and behaviour.

 

The school recognises that absence from school and exclusion from school may be indicators of abuse and neglect, including the exploitation of children. The DSL will regularly liaise with members of school staff with responsibility for behaviour and attendance to ensure risk is identified and appropriate intervention is in place to protect children from harm.

 

The school will work in partnership with Surrey Police and other partners for reporting children that go missing from the school site during the school day. Staff will be alert to signs of children at risk of travelling to conflict zones, female genital mutilation and forced marriage.

 

Behaviour Policy

 

Exclusions Policy

 

Attendance Policy

 

Online Safety

 

 

The school has an online safety policy which explains how we try to keep pupils safe in school and how to respond to online safety incidents.

 

Children increasingly use electronic equipment on a daily basis to access the internet, share and view content and images via social media sites such as Facebook, twitter, Instagram, snapchat and voodoo and for online gaming.

 

Some adults and other children use these technologies to harm children. The harm might range from sending hurtful or abusive texts or emails, to grooming and enticing children to engage in extremist or sexual behaviour such as webcam photography or face-to-face meetings.

 

Pupils may also be distressed or harmed by accessing inappropriate material such as pornographic websites or those which promote extremist behaviour, criminal activity, suicide or eating disorders.

 

Pupils are taught about online safety through the curriculum and all staff receive online safety training which is regularly updated. The school online safety co-ordinator is Mr Pettipher.

 

Please refer to the School's Social Media Policy for more detailed information regarding e-safety.

 

Useful websites include;

The UK Safer Internet Centre

http://www.saferinternet.org.uk

CEOP, Thinkuknow website

http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk

National Education Network for guidance on e-security

http://www.nen.gov.uk

 

Use of Mobile Phones and Cameras

 

We have a clear policy in the EYFS, Out of School Care and main school on the acceptable use of mobile phones and cameras.

 

The following rules apply for the use of personal mobile phones;

Pupils

  • Pupils are not permitted to bring mobile phones or personally owned devices into school.
  • Pupils in Year 6 who have been given permission to walk home from school must hand in their mobile phones at the school office when they arrive in the morning for safe-keeping in a locked drawer in the office during school hours.
  • If a pupil breaches the school policy then the phone or device will be confiscated and will be held in a secure place in the school office. Mobile phones and devices will be released to parents or carers in accordance with school policy.

Staff

  • The school accepts that employees will bring their mobile phones to work.
  • Mobile phones and personally owned devices brought into school are the responsibility of the device owner. The school accepts no responsibility for the loss, theft or damage of personally owned mobile phones or mobile devices.
    • Employees are not permitted to make/receive calls/texts during lessons or formal school time or use recording equipment on their mobile phones or personal devices to take photographs/videos of children.
    • Staff use of mobile phones during the school day will normally be limited to the morning/lunch break and after school.
    • Mobile phones should be switched off (or silent) and left in a safe place during lesson times. Staff should use phones in designated areas. The designated area is the Staff Room. If a private call needs to be made then a request for a room can be made to the Headteacher.
  • Mobile phones are not permitted in areas where children are present.
  • In the event that an employee has a particular reason for a specified period of time, they may request via the Headteacher that they leave their phone on during working hours.
  • If a staff member breaches the school policy then disciplinary action may be taken as appropriate.
  • Staff should ensure that their phones are protected with PIN/access codes in case of loss or theft.
  • Mobile phones should not be used in a space where children are present unless the School phone is being used for a medical reason, Out of School Care or the teacher is in a remote location such as at St Andrew's Hall, Xcel Leisure Centre or on a class outing.

Please refer to the School's Social Media Policy for more detailed information regarding the use of mobile technology such as the use of mobiles and cameras.

Peer on Peer Abuse

 

Context

Sexual violence and sexual harassment can occur between two children of any age and sex. It can also occur through a group of children sexually assaulting or sexually harassing a single child or group of children.

 

Children who are victims of sexual violence and sexual harassment will likely find the experience stressful and distressing. This will, in all likelihood, adversely affect their education attainment as well as their emotional well-being. Sexual violence and sexual harassment exist on a continuum and may overlap; they can occur online and offline (both physically and verbally) and are never acceptable. It is important that all victims are taken seriously and offered appropriate support.

 

Reports of sexual violence and sexual harassment are extremely complex to manage. It is essential that victims are protected, offered appropriate support and every effort is made to ensure education is not disrupted. It is also important that other children, adult students and school staff are supported and protected as appropriate.

Our Policy

At Westward we believe that all children have a right to attend school and learn in a safe environment. Children should be free from harm by adults and other children in school.

 

We recognise that children are capable of abusing their peers and this will be dealt with under our child protection policy and in line with KCSIE (2018).

 

We are clear that sexual violence and sexual harassment is not acceptable, will never be tolerated and is not an inevitable part of growing up.

 

We will minimise the risk of peer on peer abuse by:-

Prevention

Taking a whole school approach to safeguarding and child protection.

 

Provide staff training.

 

Providing a clear set of values and standards, underpinned by the school's behaviour policy and pastoral support; and by a planned programme of evidence based content delivered through the curriculum.

 

Engaging with specialist support and interventions.

 

Responding to reports of sexual violence and sexual harassment

Children making a report of sexual violence or sexual harassment will be taken seriously, kept safe and be well supported.

 

If the report includes an online element staff will be mindful of the Searching, Screening and Confiscation:advice for schools (DfE 2018) guidance.

 

Staff taking the report will inform the DSL or the Deputy DSL immediately.

 

Staff taking a report will never promise confidentiality.

 

Parents or carers should usually be informed (unless this would put the child at greater risk).

 

If a child is at risk of harm, is in immediate danger, or has been harmed, a referral (MARF) will be made to the MASH email: csmash@surreycc.gov.uk or telephone 0300 470 9100, as appropriate.

 

Risk Assessment:-

Following a report the DSL will make an immediate risk and needs assessment on a case-by-case basis.

 

The Risk assessment will consider;

  • The victim, especially their protection and support.
  • The alleged perpetrator, their support needs and discipline action.
  • All other children at the school.
  • The victim and the alleged perpetrator sharing classes and space at school.
  • The risk assessment will be recorded and kept under review.

 

Where there has been other professional intervention and/or other specialist risk assessments, these professional assessments will be used to inform the school's approach to supporting and protecting pupils.

 

Support regarding risk assessments can be accessed from the Education Safeguarding Team - education.safeguarding@surreycc.gov.uk

 

Action: The DSL will consider:-

  • The wishes of the victim.
  • The nature of the incident including whether a crime has been committed and the harm caused.
  • Ages of the children involved.
  • Developmental stages of the children.
  • Any power imbalance between the children.
  • Any previous incidents.
  • Ongoing risks.
  • Other related issues or wider context.

 

Options: The DSL decision making regarding the issue with the following possible options:-

  • Manage internally
  • Early Help intervention
  • Refer to MASH
  • Report to the police (generally in parallel with a referral to MASH)

 

Ongoing Response:

 

The DSL will manage each case individually and will ensure the risk assessment is reviewed regularly with relevant partner agencies, for example the Police and Children's Social Care.

 

Where there is a criminal investigation into a rape, assault by penetration or sexual assault, the alleged perpetrator should be removed from any classes they share with the victim.

 

The DSL will consider how best to keep the victim and perpetrator a reasonable distance apart on school premises and on transport where appropriate.

 

Where a criminal investigation into a rape or assault by penetration leads to a conviction or caution, the school will take suitable action. In all but the most exceptional circumstances, the rape or assault is likely to constitute a serious breach of discipline and may lead to the view that allowing the perpetrator to remain in the same school would seriously harm the education or welfare of the victim (and potentially themselves and other pupils).

 

Where a criminal investigation into sexual assault leads to a conviction or caution, the school will, if it has not already, consider any suitable sanctions in light of their behaviour policy, which may include consideration of permanent exclusion. Where the perpetrator is going to remain at the school, the Headteacher should continue keeping the victim and perpetrator in separate classes and continue to consider the most appropriate way to manage potential contact on school premises and transport. The nature of the conviction or caution and wishes of the victim will be especially important in determining how to proceed in such cases.

 

The victim, alleged perpetrator and any other affected children and adults will receive appropriate support and safeguards on a case-by-case basis.

 

The school will take any disciplinary action against the alleged perpetrator in accordance with the school behaviour policy.

 

The school recognises that taking disciplinary action and providing support are not mutually exclusive actions and will occur at the same time if necessary.

 

Physical Abuse

While a clear focus of peer on peer abuse is around sexual abuse and harassment, physical assaults and initiation violence and rituals from pupils to pupils can also be abusive.

 

These are equally not tolerated and if it is believed that a crime has been committed, will be reported to the police.

 

The principles from the anti-bullying policy will be applied in these cases, with recognition that any police investigation will need to take priority.

 

References:

DfE Keeping Children Safe in Education 2018

DfE Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment between Children in School and Colleges May 2018

Harmful Sexual Behaviour

 

 The Brook Traffic Light Tool uses a traffic light system to categorise the sexual behaviours of young people and is designed to help professionals:

  • Make decisions about safeguarding children and young people
  • Assess and respond appropriately to sexual behaviour in children and young people
  • Understand healthy sexual development and distinguish it from harmful behaviour
  • By categorising sexual behaviours, school can work with other agencies to the same standardised criteria making decisions and can protect children and young people with a multi-agency approach.

The school recognise that it is vital that professionals agree on how behaviours should be categorised regardless of culture, faith, beliefs, and their own experiences or values.

 

 

Youth produced sexual imagery (sexting)

 

The practice of children sharing images and video via text message, email, social media or mobile messaging apps has become commonplace. However, this online technology has also given children the opportunity to produce and distribute sexual imagery in the form of photos and videos. Such imagery involving anyone under the age of 18 is illegal.

 

Youth produced sexual imagery refers to both images and videos where;

  • A person under the age of 18 creates and shares sexual imagery of themselves with a peer under the age of 18.
  • A person under the age of 18 shares sexual imagery created by another person under the age of 18 with a peer under the age of 18 or an adult.
  • A person under the age of 18 is in possession of sexual imagery created by another person under the age of 18.

 

All incidents of this nature should be treated as a safeguarding concern and in line with the UKCCIS guidance Sexting in schools and colleges:responding to incidents and safeguarding young people.

 

Cases where sexual imagery of people under 18 has been shared by adults and where sexual imagery of a person of any age has been shared by an adult to a child is child sexual abuse and should be responded to accordingly.

 

If a member of staff becomes aware of an incident involving youth produced sexual imagery they should follow the child protection procedures and refer to the DSL as soon as possible. The member of staff should confiscate the device involved and set it to flight mode or, if this is not possible, turn it off. Staff should not view, copy or print the youth produced sexual imagery.

 

The DSL should hold an initial review meeting with appropriate school staff and subsequent interviews with the children involved (if appropriate). Parents should be informed at an early stage and involved in the process unless there is reason to believe that involving parents would put the child at risk of harm. At any point in the process if there is concern a young person has been harmed or is at risk of harm a referral should be made to Children’s Social Care or the Police as appropriate.

 

Immediate referral at the initial review stage should be made to Children’s Social Care/Police if;

  • The incident involves an adult;
  • There is good reason to believe that a young person has been coerced, blackmailed or groomed or if there are concerns about their capacity to consent (for example, owing to special educational needs);
  • What you know about the imagery suggests the content depicts sexual acts which are unusual for the child’s developmental stage or are violent;
  • The imagery involves sexual acts;
  • The imagery involves anyone aged 12 or under;
  • There is reason to believe a child is in immediate risk of harm owing to the sharing of the imagery, for example the child is presenting as suicidal or self-harming.

 

If none of the above apply then the DSL will use their professional judgement to assess the risk to pupils involved and may decide, with input from the Deputy DSL’s and/or e-safety officer, to respond to the incident without escalation to Children’s Social Care or the police.

 

In applying judgement the DSL will consider if;

  • There is a significant age difference between the sender/receiver;
  • There is coercion or encouragement beyond sender/receiver;
  • The imagery was shared and received with the knowledge of the child in the imagery;
  • The child is more vulnerable than usual i.e. at risk;
  • There is significant impact on the children involved;
  • The image is of a severe or extreme nature;
  • The child involved understands consent;
  • The situation is isolated or if the image has been more widely distributed;
  • There are other circumstances relating to either the sender or recipient that may add cause for concern i.e. difficult home circumstances;
  • The children have been involved in incidents related to youth produced imagery before.

 

In any of these circumstances are present the situation will be escalated according to our child protection procedures, including reporting to the police or children’s social care. Otherwise, the situation will be managed within the school.

 

The DSL will record all incidents of youth produced sexual imagery, including both the actions taken, actions not taken, reasons for doing so and the resolution in line with safeguarding recording procedures.

  

You can access guidance and practical support by clicking on the links provided below;

 

Expert and professional organisations are best placed to provide up to date guidance and practical support on specific safeguarding issues such as child sexual exploitation (CSE), bullying including cyber bullying, domestic violence, drugs, fabricated or induced illness, faith abuse, female genital mutilation (FGM), forced marriage, gangs and youth violence, gender-based and honour based violence/violence against women and girls (VAWG), breast ironing (BI)), mental health, private fostering, preventing radicalisation and extremism, sexting, teenage relationship abuse, trafficking and disguised compliance.

 

NSPCC

http://www.nspcc.org.uk

Government website

http://www.gov.uk

(Type the topic you require guidance and support for into the search box)

Other useful sites include;

http://www.familylives.org.uk

http://www.kidscape.org.uk

http://www.childline.org

http://www.youngminds.org.uk



Procedure for allegations of abuse made against a member of staff at Westward School.

 

We have regard for the DfE guidance 'Keeping Children Safe in Education' (September 2018)

We understand that concerns about the behaviour of a member of staff toward a pupil may be made in the form of a complaint or allegation.

All staff at Westward are required to follow the Staff Code of Conduct which is provided during induction.

Staff members must sign annually to say that they agree to adhere to the School's Code of Conduct.

Concerns may be raised in a number of ways e.g.

  • Direct disclosure by a pupil
  • Indirect disclosure, e.g. through written/art work or through friends
  • Complaint from a parent/carer to:Headteacher/Proprietor/LEA/Social Services or Police
  • Reports by other colleagues or agencies
  • Anonymously

 

All staff should be aware of their duty to raise concerns about the attitude or actions of colleagues. (Refer to whistle blowing policy and the staff code of conduct).

 

IF IT IS ALLEGED THAT A MEMBER OF STAFF HAS;

  • Behaved in a way that has harmed a child or may have harmed a child.
  • Possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child, or
  • Behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates he or she would pose a risk of harm if they work regularly or closely with children.

 

The procedure below should be followed

 

PROCEDURE IF ALLEGATION IS AGAINST A STAFF MEMBER

  • If such an allegation is made the Headteacher will be immediately informed.
  • The Headteacher will within 24 hours contact the Local authority designated officer for allegations (LADO) and discuss the allegation. The proprietor will be informed.
  • Surrey LADO (Local Authority Designated Officer) Contact Details

Telephone: 0300 123 1650

Select Option 3

  • The Headteacher and LADO will consider the nature, content and context of the allegation and agree a course of action.
  • The Headteacher and LADO will decide whether the alleged incident should be referred on to Social Services or the Police or no further action needs to be taken.
  • The case manager (Headteacher) will inform the accused person about the allegation as soon as possible after consulting with the LADO. They will be provided with as much information as possible at that time. However, where a strategy discussion is needed, or police, or children's social care services need to be involved, the case manager (Headteacher) should not do that until those agencies have been consulted, and have agreed what information can be disclosed to the accused.
  • The decision with reasoning will be clearly recorded.
  • The involvement of an LEA officer ensures that cases are dealt with impartially and help avoid any possible accusation of collusion.
  • The School will follow the framework set out in "Keeping Children Safe in Education" September 2018 at all times.
  • The School will promptly report to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) a staff member (Whether employed, contracted, a volunteer or student) leaving the School to inform them that they are no longer used because he or she is considered unsuitable to work with children.

 

PROCEDURE IF ALLEGATION IS AGAINST THE HEADTEACHER

  • If such an allegation is made against the Headteacher the staff member must contact the proprietor whose details can be accessed via the allegations poster on the staff notice board.
  • The proprietor will within 24 hours contact the Local Authority Designated Officer for allegations (LADO) and discuss the allegation.
  • Surrey LADO (Local Authority Designated Officer) Contact Details

Telephone: 0300 123 1650

Select Option 3

  • The proprietor and LADO will consider the nature, content and context of the allegation and agree a course of action.
  • The proprietor and LADO will decide whether the alleged incident should be referred on to Social Services or the Police or no further action needs to be taken.
  • The case manager (proprietor) will inform the Headteacher about the allegation as soon as possible after consulting with the LADO. They will be provided with as much information as possible at that time. However, where a strategy discussion is needed, or police, or children's social care services need to be involved, the case manager (proprietor) should not do that until those agencies have been consulted, and have agreed what information can be disclosed to the Headteacher.
  • The decision with reasoning will be clearly recorded.
  • The involvement of an LEA officer ensures that cases are dealt with impartially and help avoid any possible accusation of collusion.
  • The School will follow the framework set out in "Keeping Children Safe in Education" September 2018 at all times.
  • The School will promptly report to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) a staff member (Whether employed, contracted, a volunteer or student) leaving the School to inform them that they are no longer used because he or she is considered unsuitable to work with children.

 

PROCEDURE IF ALLEGATION IS AGAINST THE PROPRIETOR

  • If such an allegation is made the Headteacher will be immediately informed.
  • The Headteacher will within 24 hours contact the Local authority designated officer for allegations (LADO) and discuss the allegation.
  • Surrey LADO (Local Authority Designated Officer) Contact Details

Telephone: 0300 123 1650

Select Option 3

 

  • The Headteacher and LADO will consider the nature, content and context of the allegation and agree a course of action.
  • The Headteacher and LADO will decide whether the alleged incident should be referred on to Social Services or the Police or no further action needs to be taken.
  • The case manager (Headteacher) will inform the proprietors about the allegation as soon as possible after consulting with the LADO. They will be provided with as much information as possible at that time. However, where a strategy discussion is needed, or police, or children's social care services need to be involved, the case manager (Headteacher) should not do that until those agencies have been consulted, and have agreed what information can be disclosed to the proprietors.
  • The decision with reasoning will be clearly recorded.
  • The involvement of an LEA officer ensures that cases are dealt with impartially and help avoid any possible accusation of collusion.
  • The School will follow the framework set out in "Keeping Children Safe in Education" September 2018 at all times.
  • The School will promptly report to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) a staff member (Whether employed, contracted, a volunteer or student) leaving the School to inform them that they are no longer used because he or she is considered unsuitable to work with children.

 

The Headteacher has a continuing duty of care to any member of staff who becomes the subject of an allegation.

We aim to deal with any allegations of abuse made against a teacher,other member of staff, volunteer, Headteacher or proprietor in the school as quickly, fairly and consistently as we can to provide effective protection for the child and at the same time support the person who is the subject of an allegation.

 

Consideration is given to making a referral to the Teaching Regulation Agency (TRA) where a teacher has been dismissed (or would have been dismissed had he or she not resigned) and a prohibition order may be appropriate, because of 'unacceptable professional conduct', 'conduct that may bring the profession into disrepute', or a 'conviction at any time for a relevant offence'.

 

Unless the allegation is found to be malicious, records will be kept for 10 years or until the individual, subject to investigation, retires - whichever is longer.

 

A report will be made to OFSTED within 14 days if there is an allegation of serious harm or abuse by any person living, working or looking after children at the premises or elsewhere, or any other abuse on the premises.

 

Whistle-blowing

 

We recognise that children cannot be expected to raise concerns in an environment where staff fail to do so.

All staff should be aware of their duty to raise concerns, where they exist, about the management of child protection, which may include the attitude or actions of colleagues, poor or unsafe practice or potential failures in the school’s safeguarding arrangements. If it becomes necessary to consult outside the school, they should speak in the first instance, to the Area Education Officer (LADO) following the Whistleblowing Policy.

The NSPCC whistleblowing helpline is available for staff who do not feel able to raise concerns regarding child protection failures internally or have concerns about a way a concern is being handled by their school. Staff can call: 0800 028 0285 - line is available from 8.00am to 8.00pm, Monday to Friday and Email: help@nspcc.org.uk.

Whistleblowing re the Headteacher should be made to the proprietor whose contact details are readily available to staff.

 

 Restrictive Physical Intervention

 

We acknowledge that staff must only ever use physical intervention as a last resort, when a child is or at immediate risk of harming him/herself or others, and that at all times it must be the minimal force necessary to prevent injury to another person. Such events should be fully recorded and signed by a witness.

 

Staff who are likely to need to use physical intervention will be appropriately trained in “Positive Options” techniques.

 

Staff understand that physical intervention of a nature which causes injury or distress to a child may be considered under child protection and/or disciplinary procedures.

 

We recognise that touch is appropriate in the context or working with children, and all staff have been given ‘Safe Practice’ guidance to ensure they are clear about their professional boundaries.

 

When applying disciplinary measures such as physical intervention or isolation for children with SEND the school will consider the risks, given the additional vulnerabilities of these children.

 

Surrey County Council guidance Touch and the use of restrictive Physical Intervention When Working with Children and Young People provides further detailed information.


 

Appendices

 

Appendix 1 Indicators of Abuse

 

Indicators of Abuse

Appendix 2 Extremism

 

Extremism

Appendix 3 Domestic Abuse

 

Domestic Abuse

Appendix 4 Child Sexual Exploitation

 

Child Sexual Exploitation

Appendix 5 Female Genital Mutilation

 
Female Genital Mutilation