Westward School

CHILD PROTECTION AND SAFEGUARDING Policy

Last Updated: September 2021

Next Review Date: September 2022

 

"Safeguarding is Everyone's Business"

  

This policy will be reviewed at least annually with the proprietor and/or the nominated advisory board member for Child Protection, including an update and review of the effectiveness of procedures and their implementation.

At Westward School we recognise our moral and statutory responsibility to safeguard and promote the welfare of all pupils in the Main School, EYFS and the Westward Out of School Care facilities.

We make every effort to provide an environment in which children and adults feel safe, secure, valued and respected, and feel confident to talk if they are worried, believing they will be effectively listened to. 

The purpose of this policy is to provide staff, volunteers, the proprietor and nominated advisory board member for Child Protection with the framework they need in order to keep children safe and secure in our school. The policy also informs parents and carers how we will safeguard their children whilst they are in our care.

Key Personnel

 

The Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) is :  

Mrs Shelley Stevenson (Headteacher)

 

Contact details: email: dsl@westwardschool.co.uk    Telephone: 01932 220911

 

The Deputy DSL's are

Mrs Kelly Callaby (Head of Early Years/Lower School) and Ms Sharon Drislane (Year 4 Teacher/PSHE Coordinator/Mental Health Lead)

 

Contact details: email: dsl@westwardschool.co.uk     Telephone: 01932 220911

 

 

The Headteacher is:

Mrs Shelley Stevenson

 

Contact details: email: sstevenson@westwardschool.co.uk

Telephone: 01932 220911

 

The Nominated Advisory Board Member for Child Protection is:

Mr Johnnie Parkhurst (Chief Operating Officer)

 

Contact details: jparkhurst@westwardschool.co.uk    Telephone: 01932 220911

 

The Proprietor is:

Mrs Patricia Townley

 

Contact details: ptownley@westwardschool.co.uk

 

 Terminology

Terminology

 

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is defined as:

  • protecting children from maltreatment;
  • preventing impairment of children's health or development;
  • ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care;
  •  taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes;
  • preventing impairment of children's mental and physical health or development.

.

 

Child Protection is a part of safeguarding and promoting welfare. It refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are likely to suffer, significant harm.

 

Early Help means providing support as soon as any needs emerge or are identified at any point in a child's life.

 

Staff refer to all those working for or on behalf of the school, full or part time, temporary or permanent, in either a paid or voluntary capacity.

 

Child(ren) includes everyone under the age of 18. On the whole, this will apply to pupils of our school; however the policy will extend to visiting children and students from other establishments.

 

Parents refer to birth parents and other adults who are in a parenting role, for example stepparents, foster carers and adoptive parents.

 

Social Care refers to Children's Services in the area in which the child is resident, unless a child is a Child Looked After then this will be the Children's Services in their home authority.

 

MAP refers to the Surrey Multi-Agency Partnership.

 

C-SPA refers to the Surrey Children's Single Point of Access

 

Introduction


This policy has been developed in accordance with the principles established by the Children Acts 1989 and 2004; the Education Act 2002, and in line with statutory guidance: 'Working Together to Safeguard Children' 2018, Revised Safeguarding Statutory Guidance 'Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families' 2000, 'What to do if You are Worried a Child is Being Abused' 2015.

The policy also reflects, both statutory guidance 'Keeping Children Safe in Education' 2021 (KCSIE), and  Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership (SSCP) Procedures.

The Proprietor takes seriously their responsibility under section 175/157 of the Education Act 2002 to safeguard and promote the welfare of children; and to work together with other agencies to ensure there are robust arrangements within our school to identify, assess, and support those children who are suffering harm or at risk from suffering harm.

This policy applies to all members of staff, the Proprietors and the nominated advisory board Member for Child Protection.

 

Guidance and documents referred to in this policy

 Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership protocols, guidance and procedures

Working Together to Safeguard Children (July 2018)

Keeping Children Safe in Education KCSIE (Sep 21)

Keeping Children Safe in Education KCSIE - Part One

Disqualification under the Childcare Act (Aug 18)

Multi-agency Statutory Guidance on Female Genital Mutilation (July 2020)

Mandatory Reporting of Female Genital Mutilation Procedural Information (Last updated January 2020)

What to do if you're worried a child is being abused (March 2015)

Teacher Standards 2011 (introduction updated 2013) (Terminology updated July 2021)

The Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage  (Sep 21)

Information Sharing Advice for Practitioners' guidance (2018)

The Equality Act 2010

Sexual violence and sexual harassment between children in schools and colleges (Sep 2021)

Children Missing Education (September 2016)

 

 

When to call the police, non-statutory guidance from the National Police Chiefs' Council

The Prevent Duty: Departmental advice for schools and childminders (June 15)

Mental Health and Behaviour in Schools: Departmental advice (Nov 2018)

Sharing nudes and semi-nudes:advice for education settings working with children and young people

Criminal Exploitation of Children and Vulnerable Adults: Country Lines Guidance

 

 

POLICY PRINCIPLES and values

The welfare of the child is paramount

 Maintain an attitude of "It could happen here".

Children have a right to feel safe and secure, they cannot learn effectively unless they do so.

All children have a right to be protected from harm and abuse.

All staff have a role in the prevention of harm and abuse and an equal responsibility to act immediately on any suspicion or disclosure that may indicate a child is at risk of harm, either in the school or in the community, taking into account contextual safeguarding, in accordance with statutory guidance.

We acknowledge that working in partnership with other agencies protects children and reduces risk and so will engage in partnership working to protect and safeguard children.

Whilst the school will work openly with parents as far as is possible, it reserves the right to contact Social Services or the Police, without notifying parents if this is believed to be in the child's best interests.

 

POLICY AIMS

To demonstrate the school’s commitment with regard to safeguarding and child protection to pupils, parents and other partners.

 

To raise the awareness of all teaching and non-teaching staff of their responsibilities to safeguard children through identifying and reporting possible cases of abuse.

 

To enable the school to effectively contribute to Early Help, assessments of need and support for those children.

 

To provide robust school systems and procedures that is followed by all members of the school community in cases of suspected abuse.

  

To develop and promote effective working relationships with other agencies, in particular Early Help providers, the Police, Health and Social Care.

 

To ensure that all staff working within our school who have substantial access to children have been checked as to their suitability, including verification of their identity, qualifications, and a satisfactory DBS check (according to KCSIE 2021 guidance), and a single central record is kept for audit. (Refer to the Recruitment Policy for more detailed information)

We comply with the Disqualification under the Childcare Act 2006 guidance last updated in August 2018.

 

supporting children

 

Our school will support all children:

 

We recognise that school may provide a safe place and the only stability in the lives of children who have been abused or who are at risk of harm. We recognise that a child who is abused or witnesses abuse and/or violence may feel helpless and humiliated, may blame themselves, and find it difficult to develop and maintain a sense of self-worth. We accept that research shows that the behaviour of a child in these circumstances may range from that which is perceived to be normal to aggressive or withdrawn.

 

  • We will promote a caring, safe and positive environment within the school.
  • We will encourage self-esteem and self-assertiveness, through the curriculum and through positive relationships within the school community.
  • We will ensure children are taught to understand and manage risk through personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education and Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and through all aspects of school life, including staying safe online.
  • We will respond sympathetically to any requests for time out to deal with distress and/or anxiety.
  • We will offer details of helplines, counselling or other avenues of external support.
  • We will liaise and work in partnership with other support services and agencies involved in Early Help and the safeguarding of children.
  • We will notify Social Care immediately if there is an immediate risk of significant harm.
  • We will provide contining support to children about whom there have been concerns who leaves the school by ensuring that information is shared confidentially with the child’s new setting. We will ensure the school records are forwarded as a matter of priority and within statutory timescales.

 

PREVENTION AND PROTECTION

We recognise that the school plays a significant part in the prevention of harm to our children by providing pupils with good lines of communication with trusted adults, supportive friends and an ethos of protection.

 

The school will:

  • Establish and maintain an ethos where children feel safe and secure, are encouraged to talk and are always listened to. There are worry boxes located in each classroom and in areas such as the school office.
  • Include regular consultation with children e.g. through questionnaires, participation in anti-bullying activities, asking children to report whether they have had happy/sad lunchtimes/playtimes and drop in sessions with the mental health lead.
  • Ensure that all children know they can access an adult in the school whom they can approach if they are worried or in difficulty.
  • Include safeguarding across the curriculum, including PSHE, opportunities which equip children with the skills they need to stay safe from harm and to know to whom they should turn for help. In particular this will include anti-bullying work, online-safety, accessing emergency services, road safety, pedestrian and cycle training. Also focused work in Year 6 to prepare for transition to Secondary school and more personal safety/independent travel.
  • Ensure all staff are aware of school guidance for their use of mobile technology as set out in the Staff Code of Conduct and have discussed safeguarding issues around the use of mobile technologies and their associated risks.

 

SAFE SCHOOL, SAFE STAFF

We will ensure that;

 

The school operates safer recruitment procedures in line with KCSIE 2021 and that it includes statutory checks on the suitability of staff to work with children.

 

This will include appropriate disqualification under the Childcare Act 2006 checks to be carried out on relevant staff. Staff are covered by this legislation if they are employed or engaged to provide early years childcare (this covers the age range from birth until 1 September following a child’s fifth birthday, that is up to and including reception year) or later years childcare (this covers children above reception age but who have not attained the age of 8) in nursery, primary or secondary school settings, or if they are directly concerned with the management of such childcare.

 

Relevant staff will be reminded that if their circumstances change they must inform the school.

 

All staff receive during induction and annually information about the school’s safeguarding arrangements, the school’s safeguarding statement, staff behaviour policy (code of conduct), child protection and safeguarding policy, the role and names of the Designated Safeguarding Lead and their deputies, Keeping Children Safe in Education part 1 and annex B and the pupil behaviour policy.

 

All staff receive safeguarding and child protection training at induction in line with advice from Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership which is regularly updated and receive safeguarding and child protection updates (for example, via email, e-bulletins, e-learning modules and staff meetings), as required, but at least annually;

 

All members of staff are trained in and receive regular updates in online safety and reporting concerns.

 

All staff members maintain a zero-tolerance approach to sexual violence and sexual harassment.

 

All staff, the proprietor and any nominated child protection advisory board members have regular child protection awareness training, updated by the DSL as appropriate, to maintain their understanding of the signs and indicators of abuse;

 

The Child Protection and Safeguarding policy is made available via the school website and that parents/carers are made aware of this policy.

 

All parents/carers are made aware of the responsibilities of staff members with regard to child protection procedures through the publication of the child protection and safeguarding policy, reference to it in the school's staff handbook and posters displayed throughout the school.

 

We provide a coordinated offer of Early Help when additional needs of children are identified and contributes to early help arrangements and inter-agency working and plans.

 

Our Visiting Speakers policy will seek to ensure the suitability of adults working with children on the school site at any time and ensure that any groups using the school premises have child protection policies and procedures in place.

 

Community users organising activities for children are aware of the school’s child protection and safeguarding policy, guidelines and procedures.

 

The name of the designated members of staff for child protection , the Designated Safeguarding Lead and deputies, are clearly advertised in the school with a statement explaining the school’s role in referring and monitoring cases of suspected harm and abuse.

 

All staff will be given a copy of Part 1 and Annex B of Keeping Children Safe in Education 2021 and will sign to say they have read and understood it. This applies to the Proprietor and nominated advisory board members in relation to part 2 of the same guidance.

 

Roles and Responsibilities

 

all  staff

Have a key role to play in identifying concerns early and in providing help for children. To achieve this they will:

 

Provide a safe environment in which children can learn.

 

Establish and maintain an environment where children feel secure, are encouraged to talk and are listened to.

 

Ensure children know that there are adults in the school who they can approach if they are worried or have concerns.

 

Ensure that all staff are aware that mental health problems can, in some cases, be an indicator that a child has suffered or is at risk of suffering abuse, neglect or exploitation. Refer to Mental Health and Wellbeing Policy

 

Ensure only appropriately trained professionals  attempt to make a diagnosis of a mental health problem. Staff however, are well placed to observe children day-to-day and identify those whose behaviour suggests that they may be experiencing a mental health problem or be at risk of developing one.

 

Take immediate action if they have a mental health concern about a child that is also a safeguarding concern, following our Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy and Procedures.

 

Plan opportunities within the curriculum for children to develop skills they need to assess and manage risk appropriately and keep themselves safe.

 

Attend training in order to be aware of and alert to the signs of abuse and neglect.

 

Maintain an attitude of "it could happen here" with regards to safeguarding.

 

Understand that safeguarding is "everyone's responsibility".

 

Know how to respond to a pupil who discloses harm or abuse following training of 'Working together to Safeguard Children', and 'What to do if you are worried a child is being Abused' (2015).

 

Record their concerns if they are worried that a child is being abused and report these to the DSL immediately that day. If the DSL is not contactable immediately a Deputy DSL should be informed.

 

Be prepared to refer directly to the Children's Single Point of Access (C-Spa), and the Police if appropriate, if there is a risk if significant harm and the DSL or their deputies are not available.

 

Follow the allegations procedure if the disclosure is an allegation against a member of staff.

 

Report low-level concerns (as defined in KCSIE 2021) about any member of staff/supply staff or contractor to the DSL (or deputy) and where a low-level concern is raised about the DSL it will be shared with the Proprietor.

 

Follow the procedures set out by the Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership and take account of guidance issued by the Department for Education to safeguard children.

 

Provide support for children subject to Early Help, Child in Need or Child Protection that is in keeping with their plan.

 

Treat information with confidentiality but never promising to "keep a secret".

 

Notify the DSL or their Deputy of any child on a child protection plan or child in need plan who has unexplained absence.

 

Understand Early Help, and be prepared to identify and support children who may benefit from Early Help.

 

Will identify children who may benefit from Early Help, liaising with the DSL in the first instance. (Options may include managing support for the child internally via the schools pastoral support process or an Early Help assessment). In some circumstances it may be appropriate for a member of school staff to act as Lead Professional in Early Help cases. 

 

Liaise with other agencies that support pupils and provide early help.

 

Know who the DSL and Deputy DSL's are and know how to contact them.

 

Have an awareness of the role of the DSL, the school's Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy, Behaviour Policy and Staff Code of Conduct, and procedures relating to the safeguarding response for children who go missing from education.

 

Be mindful that the Teacher Standards states that teachers should safeguard children's wellbeing and maintain public trust in the teaching profession as part of their professional duties.

 

Assist the Proprietor, Nominated Advisory Board Member for Child Protection and the Headteacher in fulfilling their safeguarding responsibilities set out in legislation and statutory guidance.

 

  

THE HEADTEACHER WHO IS ALSO THE DSL WILL ENSURE THAT;

 In addition to the role and responsibility of all staff the Headteacher will ensure that:

 

The school fully contributes to inter-agency working in line with Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018 guidance.

 

The Child Protection and Safeguarding policy and procedures are implemented and followed by all staff;

 

That the school has appropriate policies in place that make clear that sexual harassment, online sexual abuse and sexual violence (including sexualised language) is unacceptable, with appropriate sanctions and support in place.

 

That the school staff have appropriate knowledge of part 5 of the government's 'Keeping children safe in education' guidance.

 

That all children are supported to report concerns about harmful sexual behaviour freely. That concerns are taken seriously and dealt with swiftly and appropriately, and children are confident that this is the case. Ensure that comprehensive records are kept.

 

All staff are aware of the role of the designated safeguarding lead (DSL), including the identity of the DSL and any deputies.

 

Sufficient time, training, support, funding, resources, including cover arrangements where necessary, is allocated to the DSL to carry out their role effectively, including the provision of advice and support to school staff on child welfare and child protection matters, to take part in strategy discussions/meetings and other inter-agency meetings and/or support other staff to do so; and to contribute to the assessment of children.

 

That opportunities are provided for a co-ordinated offer of early help when additional needs of children are identified.

 

Deputy DSL's are trained to the same standard as the DSL and the role is explicit in their job description.

 

Adequate and appropriate DSL cover arrangements are in place for any out of hours/out of term activities.

 

Where there is a safeguarding concern that the child’s wishes and feelings are taken into account when determining what action to take and what services to provide;

 

Child-centred systems and processes are in place for children to express their views and give feedback.

 

All staff feel able to raise concerns about poor or unsafe practice and that such concerns are handled sensitively and in accordance with the whistle blowing procedures;

 

Children are provided with opportunities throughout the curriculum to learn about safeguarding, including keeping themselves safe online;

 

That allegations or concerns against staff are dealt with in accordance with guidance from Department of Education (DfE), Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership (SSCP) and Surrey County Council (SCC).

 

Record "low level concerns" in cases which concern a member of staff/supply staff/contractor or a volunteer. The record should include details of the concern, the context in which the concern arose, and action taken. The name of the individual sharing their concerns should also be noted, if the individual wishes to remain anonymous then that will be respected as far as reasonably possible.

 

That statutory requirements are met to make a referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service and additionally in the case of teaching staff the Teacher Regulation Agency where they think an individual has engaged in conduct that harmed (or is likely to harm) a child; or if the person otherwise poses a risk of harm to a child.

 

THE DESIGNATED SAFEGUARDING LEAD

 

In addition to the role and responsibility of all staff the DSL will:

 

Hold the lead responsibility for safeguarding and child protection (including online safety) in the school, this responsibility is not able to be delegated.

 

Have an "it could happen here" approach to safeguarding.

 

Liaise with the local authority and work in partnership with other agencies in line with Working Together to Safeguard Children.

  

Manage and submit a Request for Support Form for a child if there are concerns about suspected harm or abuse, to the Children's Single Point of Access (C-SPA), and act as a point of contact and support for school staff. Requests for support should be made securely by email to cspa@surreycc.gov.uk using the 'Request for Support Form'. Urgent referrals should be made by telephone 0300 470 9100 (and ask for the priority line).

 

Report concerns that a pupil may be at risk of radicalisation or involvement in terrorism, following the Prevent referral process and use the Prevent referral form to refer cases by e-mail to preventreferrals@surrey.pnn.police.uk. If the matter is urgent then Police must be contacted by dialling 999. In cases where further advice from the Police is sought dial 101 or 01483 632982 and ask to speak to the Prevent Supervisor for Surrey. The Department of Education has also set up a dedicated telephone helpline for staff, the advisory board members and Proprietor to raise concerns around Prevent (020 7340 7264).

 

Refer cases where a crime may have been committed to the Police as required. NB: NPCC - When to call the police should help DSL's understand when they should be calling the Police and what to expect when they do.

 

Liaise with the "case manager" and Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) for child protection concerns in cases which concern a member of staff or a volunteer; and refer cases where a person is dismissed or left service due to risk/harm to a child to the Disclosure and Barring Service and Teaching Regulation Agency, as required.

 

Follow DfE and KCSIE guidance 'Peer on Peer/Child on Child Abuse' when a concern is raised that there is an allegation of a child abusing another child within the school.

 

Follow KCSIE and DfE guidance contained in Sexual violence and sexual harassment between children in schools and colleges 2021 and be confident as to what local specialist support all children involved (including victims and perpetrators) in sexual violence and sexual harassment and be confident as to how to access this support when required.

 

When there has been a report of sexual violence, make an immediate risk and needs assessment. Additionally, where there has been a report of sexual harassment, the need for a risk assessment should be considered on a case-by-case basis and will be put in place as required.

 

Be available during term time (during school hours) for staff in school to discuss any safeguarding concerns. Appropriate and adequate cover arrangements will be arranged by the DSL and the school leadership team for any out of hours/term activities.

 

Act as a source of support and expertise in carrying out safeguarding duties for the whole school community;

 

Encourage and promote a culture of listening to children and taking account of their wishes and feelings, amongst all staff.

 

Access training and support to ensure they have the knowledge and skills required to carry out the role. DSL training should be updated at least every two years and their knowledge and skills refreshed at regular intervals but at least annually.

 

Have a secure working knowledge of SSCP procedures and understand the assessment process for providing early help and statutory intervention, including the local authority levels of need criteria and referral arrangements.  

 

Have a clear understanding of access and referral to the local Early Help offer and will support and advise members of staff where early help intervention is appropriate.

 

Understand and support the school delivery with regards to the requirements of the Prevent duty and provide advice and guidance to staff on protecting children from radicalisation.

 

Liaise with school staff (especially pastoral support, behaviour leads, school health colleagues and the SENCO) on matters of safety and safeguarding and consult the Child Safeguarding Partnership Levels of Need document to inform decision making and liaison with relevant agencies.

 

Be alert to the specific needs of children in need, those with SEND and young carers.

 

Understand the risks associated with online activity and be confident that they have the up to date knowledge and capability to keep children safe whilst online at school; in particular understand the additional risks that children with SEND face online and the associated and appropriate support they require.

 

Keep detailed, accurate records (either written or using appropriate secure online software), that include all concerns about a child even if there is no need to make an immediate referral and record the rationale for decisions made and action taken.

 

Ensure that an indication of the existence of the additional child protection file is marked on the pupil school file record.

 

Ensure that when a child transfers school (including in-year), their child protection file is passed to the new school as soon as possible, and within statutory timescales (separately from the main pupil file and ensuring secure transit) and that confirmation of receipt is received.

 

Ensure that where a child transfers school and is on a child protection plan or is a child looked after, their information is passed to the new school immediately and that the child's social worker is informed. In addition, consideration should be given to a multi-agency schools transition meeting if the case is complex and on-going.

 

If the transit method requires that a copy of the Child Protection file is retained until such time that the new school acknowledges receipt of the original file, the copy should be securely destroyed on confirmation of receipt.

 

Ensure that all appropriate staff members have a working knowledge and understanding of their role in case conferences, core groups and other multi-agency planning meetings, to ensure that they attend and are able to effectively contribute when required to do so; where a report is required, this should be shared with the parents prior to the meeting.

 

Report to the Headteacher any significant issues for example, use of the SSCP multi-agency escalation procedures, enquiries under section 47 of the Children Act 1989 and Police investigations.

 

Ensure that the case holding Social Worker is informed of any child currently with a child protection plan who is absent without explanation.

 

Ensure that all staff sign to say that they have read, understood and agree to work within the School’s Child Protection and Safeguarding policy, Staff Behaviour policy (code of conduct) and Keeping Children Safe in Education (KCSIE) Part 1 and Annex B and ensure that the policies are used effectively.

 

Organise child protection and safeguarding induction, regularly updated training and a minimum of annual updates (including online safety) for all school staff, keep a record of attendance and address any absences.

 

Ensure that in collaboration with the school leadership team, nominated advisory board member for child protection and proprietors, the Child Protection and Safeguarding policy is reviewed annually and the procedures and implementation are updated and reviewed regularly.

 

Ensure that the Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy is available publicly and that parents are aware that referrals about suspected harm and abuse will be made and the role of the school in this.

 

Establish and maintain links with the Local Authority safeguarding partners to make sure staff are aware of training opportunities and the latest policies on local safeguarding arrangements.

 

Contribute to and provide, with the Headteacher, Proprietor and Advisory Board member for Child Protection, the "Audit of Statutory Duties and Associated Responsibilities" to be submitted annually to the Surrey County Council, Education Safeguarding Team.

 

Ensure that the names of the Designated Safeguarding and Child Protection Lead and deputies, are clearly advertised in the school, with a statement explaining the school's role in referring and monitoring cases of suspected abuse.

 

Meet all other responsibilities as set out for DSL's in Keeping Children Safe in Education 2021.

  

THE DEPUTY DESIGNATED SAFEGUARDING LEAD

 In addition to the role and responsibilities of all staff the Deputy DSL will:

 

Be trained to the same standard as the Designated Safeguarding Lead and the role is explicit in their job description.

 

Provide support and capacity to the DSL in carrying out delegated activities of the DSL; however, the lead responsibility of the DSL cannot be delegated.

 

In the absence of the DSL, carries out activities necessary to ensure the ongoing safety and protection of children. In the event of the long-term absence of the DSL the deputy will assume all of the functions above.

 

THE PROPRIETOR AND NOMINATED ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS UNDERSTAND AND FULFIL THEIR RESPONSIBILITIES, NAMELY TO ENSURE THAT;

 There is a whole school approach to safeguarding.

 

The school has effective safeguarding policies and procedures including a Child Protection Policy, a Staff Behaviour Policy or Code of Conduct, a Behaviour Policy and a response to children who go missing from education.

 

Policies are consistent with Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership (SSCP) and statutory requirements, are reviewed annually and that the Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy is available on the school website.

 

The Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership (SSCP) is informed in line with local requirements about the discharge of duties via the annual safeguarding audit.

 

The school operates a safer recruitment procedure that includes statutory checks on staff suitability to work with children and disqualification by association regulations and by ensuring that there is at least one person on every recruitment panel who has completed safer recruitment training, if there is not a panel conducting interviews then the individual will have completed the safer recruitment training.

 

At least one member has completed safer recruitment training.

 

Staff have been trained appropriately and this is updated in line with guidance and all staff have read Keeping Children Safe in Education (2021) part 1 and Annex B and that mechanisms are in place to assist staff in understanding and discharging their roles and responsibilities as set out in the guidance.

 

All staff including temporary staff/supply staff, volunteers and contractors are provided with the school’s Child Protection and Safeguarding policy and Staff Code of Conduct;

 

The school has procedures for dealing with allegations of abuse against staff (including the Headteacher), volunteers and against other children and that a referral is made to the DBS and/or Teaching Regulation Agency (as applicable) if a person in regulated activity has been dismissed or removed due to safeguarding concerns, or would have had they not resigned.

 

Policies and processes are in place to deal with concerns (including allegations) which do not meet the harm threshold or "low level concerns" as defined in KCSIE 2021.

 

That a nominated Advisory Board member for safeguarding is identified.

  

A member of the senior leadership team has been appointed as the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) by the Proprietor who will take lead responsibility for safeguarding and child protection and that the role is explicit in the role holder’s job description;

 

On appointment, the DSL and deputy(s) undertake inter-agency training (SSCP Foundation Modules 1 & 2) and also undertake DSL ‘New to Role’ with 'Refresher’ training every two years as well as attending DSL network events, to refresh knowledge and skills.

 

Children are taught about safeguarding (including online safety) as part of a broad and balanced curriculum covering relevant issues through personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE) and Relationships and Sex Education (RSE).

 

The Proprietors and Nominated Advisory Board member of the school will ensure appropriate filtering and monitoring systems are in place to safeguard children online. These are monitored on a  daily basis.

 

The school will comply with DfE and Surrey County Council Children Missing Education requirements.

 

That the school will comply with regular data returns requested by the Local Authority, regarding all pupils, of statutory school age, attending alternative provision and/or on a reduced or modified timetable.

 

Clear systems and processes are in place for identifying possible mental health concerns, incuding routes to escalate and clear referral and accountability systems.

 

Enhanced and DBS checks (without barred list checks, unless the Nominated Advisory Board member is also a volunteer in the school) are in place for all members of the Advisory board and the Proprietor.

 

Any weaknesses in Safeguarding are remedied immediately.

  

Confidentiality and Sharing and Withholding Information

 

All matters relating to child protection will be treated as confidential and only shared as per the DfE Information Sharing Advice for Practitioners (July 2018) guidance. The school will refer to guidance in the Data protection:toolkit for schools - www.gov.uk/government/publications/data-protection-toolkit-for-schools to support school with data protection activity, including compliance with General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

 Information will be shared with staff within the school who 'need to know'. Relevant staff have due regard to GDPR principles which allow them to share (and withhold) information.

 

All staff must be aware that they have a professional responsibility to share information with other agencies in order to safeguard children and that the Data Protection Act 1998 and GDPR are not a barrier to sharing information where a failure to do so would place a child at risk of harm. There is a lawful basis for child protection concerns to be shared with agencies who have a statutory duty for child protection.

 

All staff must be aware that they cannot promise a child to keep secrets which might compromise the child’s safety or wellbeing.

 

All staff will always undertake to gain parent/carers consent to refer a child to Social Care unless to do so could out the child at greater risk of harm, or impede a criminal investigation.



CHILD PROTECTION PROCEDURE 

 

At Westward we recognise our duty in relation to safeguarding issues outside of School hours and all correspondence will be read and acted upon 365 days a year.

 

The following procedures apply to all staff working in the school and will be covered by training to enable staff to understand their role and responsibility.

 

The  aim of our procedures is to provide a robust framework which enables staff to take appropriate action when they are concerned that a child is being harmed or abused or is at risk of harm or abuse.

 

The primary concern at all stages must be the interests and safety of the child. Where there is a conflict of interest between the child and an adult, the interests of the child will be paramount.

 

All staff are aware that very young children and those with disabilities, special needs or with language delay may be more likely to communicate concerns with behaviours rather than words. Additionally, staff will question the cause of knocks and bumps in children who have limited mobility.

 

Contact will be made with a welfare agency (Surrey Children's Services) within 24 hours of a disclosure or suspicion of abuse.

 

Indicators of Abuse and Neglect

 

Knowing what to look for is vital to the early identification of abuse and neglect. All staff are trained to be aware of indicators of abuse and neglect so that they are able to identify cases of children who may be in need of help or protection. If staff are unsure they should always speak to the designated safeguarding lead (or a deputy).

All staff should be aware that abuse, neglect and safeguarding issues are rarely stand-alone events that can be covered by one definition or label. In most cases, multiple issues will overlap one another.

All staff should be aware that safeguarding incidents and/or behaviours can be associated with factors outside the home or school and can occur between children outside of these environments.

 

What is child abuse?

The following definitions are taken from Working Together to Safeguard Children HM Government (2018). In addition to these definitions, it should be understood that children can be abused by being sexually exploited, honour based violence, forced marriage, upskirting or female genital mutilation. To support the local context, all staff have access to the Surrey Safeguarding Partnership Levels of Need Threshold Document.

 

What is Abuse and Neglect?

 

Abuse and neglect are forms of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting, by those known to them or, more rarely, by a stranger. Abuse can take place wholly online, or technology may be used to facilitate offline abuse. They may be abused by an adult or adults or by another child or children.

  

PHYSICAL ABUSE;

 

A form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

 

emotional abuse

 

The persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child's emotional development.

 

It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or 'making fun' of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children.

 

These may include interactions that are beyond a child's developmental capability, as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing a child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another.

 

It may involve serious bullying (including cyber-bullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, though it may occur in isolation.

 

SEXUAL ABUSE;

Involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening.

 

The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example, rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including online).

 

Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children. 

 

neglect

 

Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child's basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child's health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse.

 

The Neglect Risk Assessment Tool is available to provide more detailed information regarding neglect.

 

Indicators of abuse

 

Neglect is a lack of parental care but poverty and lack of information or adequate services can be contributory factors.

 

Far more children are registered to the category of neglect on Child in Need and Child Protection plans than to the other categories. As with abuse, the number of children experiencing neglect is likely to be much higher than the numbers on the plans.

 

Neglect is a difficult form of abuse to recognise and is often seen as less serious than other categories. It is, however, very damaging: children who are neglected often develop more slowly than others and may find it hard to make friends and fit in with their peer group.

 

Neglect is often noticed at a stage when it does not pose a risk to the child. The duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children (What to do if You're Worried a Child is Being Abused DfE 2015) would suggest that an appropriate intervention or conversation at this early stage can address issues and prevent a child continuing to suffer until it reaches a point when they are at risk of harm or in significant need.

 

Neglect is often linked to other forms of abuse, so any concerns school staff should be discussed with the DSL.

 

Emotional Abuse

 

It is sometimes possible to spot emotionally abusive behaviour from parents and carers to their children, by the way that the adults are speaking to, or behaving towards children. An appropriate challenge or intervention could affect positive change and prevent more intensive work being carried out later on.

  • Emotional abuse is difficult to define, identify/recognise and/or prove.
  • Emotional abuse is chronic and cumulative and has long-term impact.
  • All kinds of abuse and neglect have emotional effects although emotional abuse can occur by itself.
  • Children can be harmed by witnessing someone harming another person - as in domestic abuse.
  • Most harm is produced in low warmth, high criticism homes, not single incidents.

Physical abuse

 

Most children collect cuts and bruises quite routinely as part of the rough and tumble of daily life. But accidental injuries normally occur on a bony prominence - e.g.  knees, shins.

 

Injuries in soft areas of the body are more likely to be inflicted intentionally and should therefore make us more alert to other concerning factors that may be present.

 

A body map can assist in the clear recording and reporting of physical abuse. The body map should only be used to record observed injuries and no child should be asked to remove clothing by a member of staff of the school.

 

In the context of school, it is normal to ask about a noticeable injury. 

Concern should increase when:

  • the explanation given does not match the injury
  • the explanation uses words or phrases that do not match the vocabulary of the child (adult words)
  • no explanation is forthcoming
  • the child (or the parent/carer) is secretive or evasive
  • the injury is accompanied by allegations of abuse or assault

 

Sexual abuse 

  

Sexual abuse is often perpetrated by people who are known and trusted by the child - e.g. relatives, family, friends, neighbours, babysitters, and people working with the child in school, faith settings, clubs or activities. Children can also be subject to child sexual exploitation.

 

Sexual exploitation is seen as a separate category of sexual abuse. The SSCP professional guidance provides school staff with information regarding indicators of CSE.

 

Characteristics of child sexual abuse:

  • it is often planned and systematic - people do not sexually abuse children by accident, though sexual abuse can be opportunistic
  • grooming the child - people who abuse children take care to choose a vulnerable child and often spend time making them dependent (this may occur online)
  • grooming the child's environment - abusers try to ensure that potential adult protectors (parents and other carers especially) are not suspicious of their motives.

 

Most people who sexually abuse children are men, but some women and other children can commit sexual abuse too.

 

 

If a member of staff suspects abuse, spots signs or indicators of abuse, or they have a disclosure of abuse made to them they must:

 

 

1. Make an initial record of the information related to the concern.

2. Report it to the DSL immediately.

3. The DSL will consider if there is a requirement for immediate medical intervention, however urgent medical intervention should not be delayed if the DSL is not immediately available. 

4. Make an accurate record (which may be used in any subsequent court proceedings) as soon as possible and within 24 hours of the occurrence, of all that has happened, including details of:

 

• Dates and times of any observations

• Dates and times of any discussions in which they were involved

• Any injuries

• Explanations given by the child/adult

• Rationale for decision making and action taken

• Any actual words or phrases used by the child

 

5. The records must be signed and dated by the author.

(Forms and Body Maps can located in the staffroom)

6. In the absence of the DSL or their Deputy, staff must be prepared to refer directly to C-SPA (and the police if appropriate) if there is the potential for immediate significant harm.

 

Following a report of concerns the DSL must:

 

1. Using the Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership Levels of Need, decide whether or not there are sufficient grounds for suspecting harm, in which cases a referral must be made to the C-SPA and the police if it is appropriate.

2. Normally the school should try to discuss any concerns about a child's welfare with the family and where possible to seek their agreement before making a referral to C-SPA. However, this should only be done when it will not place the child at increased risk or could impact a Police investigation. The child's views should also be considered.

 

If there are grounds to suspect a child is suffering, or is likely to suffer, significant harm or abuse the DSL must contact the C-SPA. By sending a 'Request for Support Form' by secure email to cspa@surreycc.gov.uk or contact the Single Point of Access (C-SPA). If a child is in immediate danger and urgent protective action is required, the Police (dial 999) must be called. The DSL must also notify the C-SPA of the occurrence and what action has been taken.

 

3. If the DSL feels unsure about whether a referral is necessary they can phone the C-SPA to discuss concerns.

4. If there is not a risk of significant harm, the DSL will either actively monitor the situation or consider offering early help.

5. Where there are doubts or reservations about involving the child's family, the DSL should clarify with the C-SPA or the Police whether the parents should be told about the referral and, if so, when and by whom. This is important in cases where the Police may need to conduct a criminal investigation.

6. When a pupil is in need of urgent medical attention and there is suspicion of abuse the DSL or a Deputy should take the child to the accident and emergency unit at the nearest hospital, having first notified the C-SPA. The DSL should seek advice about what action the C-SPA will take and about informing the parents, remembering that parents should normally be informed that a child requires urgent hospital attention.

7. The exception to this process will be in those cases of known FGM where there is a mandatory responsibility for the teacher to report directly to the police. The DSL should also be made aware.

 

Child Protection Procedures Flowchart

 

 /docs/safeguarding_flowchart_2019.pdf

Dealing with Disclosures

 

 All Staff

A member of staff who is approached by a child should listen positively and try to reassure them. They cannot promise complete confidentiality and should explain that they may need to pass information to other professionals to help keep the child or other children safe. The degree of confidentiality should always be governed by the need to protect the child.

 

Additional consideration needs to be given to children with communication difficulties and for those whose preferred language is not English. It is important to communicate with them in a way that is appropriate for their age, understanding and preference.

 

All staff should know who the DSL is and who to approach if the DSL is unavailable. All staff have a right to make a referral to the C-SPA or Police directly and should do this if, for whatever reason, there are difficulties following the agreed protocol, for example, they are the only adult on the school premises at the time and have concerns about sending a child home.

Guiding Principles, the seven R's

Receive 

  • Listen to what is being said, without displaying shock or disbelief
  • Accept what is said and take it seriously
  • Make a note of what is said as soon as practicable

Reassure

  • Reassure the pupil, but only so far as is honest and reliable
  • Don't make promises you may not be able to keep e.g. 'I'll stay with you' or 'everything will be alright now' or 'I'll keep this confidential'
  • Do reassure, for example, you could say: 'I believe you', 'I am glad you came to me', 'I am sorry this has happened', 'We are going to do something together to get help'

Respond

  • Respond to the pupil only as far as is necessary for you to establish whether or not you need to refer this matter, but do not interrogate for full details
  • Do not ask 'leading' questions i.e. 'did he touch your private parts?' or 'did she hurt you?' Such questions may invalidate your evidence (and the child's) in any later prosecution in court
  • Do not ask the child why something happened
  • Do not criticise the alleged perpetrator; the pupil may care about him/her, and reconciliation may be possible
  • Do not ask the pupil to repeat it all for another member of staff. Explain what you have to do next and whom you have to talk to. Reassure the pupil that it will be a senior member of staff

Report

  • Share concerns with the DSL immediately
  • If you are not able to contact your DSL or the Deputy DSL, and the child is t risk of immediate harm, contact the C-SPA or Police, as appropriate directly
  • If you are dissatisfied with the level of response following your concerns, you should press for re-consideration

Record

  • If possible make some very brief notes at the time, and write them up as soon as possible
  • Keep your original notes on file
  • Record the date, time, place, persons present and noticeable non verbal behaviour, and words used by the child. If the child uses sexual 'pet' words, record the actual words used, rather than translating them into 'proper' words
  • If appropriate, complete a body map to indicate the position of any noticeable bruising
  • Record facts and observable things, rather than your 'interpretations' or 'assumptions'

Remember

  • Support the child:listen, reassure, and be available
  • Complete confidentiality is essential. Share your knowledge only with appropriate professional colleagues
  • Get some support for yourself if you need it

Review (Led by DSL)

  • Has the action taken provided good outcomes for the child?
  • Did the procedure work?
  • Were any deficiencies or weaknesses identified in the procedure? Have these been remedied?
  • Is further training required?

 

What happens next?

It is important that concerns are followed up and it is everyone's responsibility to ensure that they are. The member of staff should be informed by the DSL what has happened following a report being made. If they do not receive information they should seek it out.

 

If they have concerns that the disclosure has not been acted upon appropriately they might inform the Headteacher or the Nominated Advisory Board member for Child Protection and/or make contact the C-SPA.

 

Receiving a disclosure can be upsetting for the member of staff and schools should have a procedure for supporting them after a disclosure. This might include reassurance that they have followed procedure correctly and that their swift actions will enable allegations to be handled appropriately.

 

In some cases additional counselling might be needed and staff should be encouraged to recognise that disclosures can have an impact on their own emotions.

 

Remember anyone can make a referral.

 

Allegations of abuse made against staff

Section 1 : Allegations that may meet the harms threshold

 

We have regard for the DfE guidance 'Keeping Children Safe in Education' (September 2021)

We understand that concerns about the behaviour of a member of staff toward a pupil may be made in the form of a complaint or allegation.

All staff at Westward are required to follow the Staff Code of Conduct which is provided during induction.

Staff members must sign annually to say that they agree to adhere to the School's Code of Conduct.

Concerns may be raised in a number of ways e.g.

  • Direct disclosure by a pupil
  • Indirect disclosure, e.g. through written/art work or through friends
  • Complaint from a parent/carer to:Headteacher/Proprietor/LEA/Social Services or Police
  • Reports by other colleagues or agencies
  • Anonymously

 

All staff should be aware of their duty to raise concerns about the attitude or actions of colleagues. (Refer to whistle blowing policy and the staff code of conduct).

 

PROCEDURE

This procedure should be used in all cases in which it is alleged a member of staff, including supply staff or volunteer in the school, or another adult who works with children has:

 

  • Behaved in a way that has harmed a child or may have harmed a child.
  • Possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child, or
  • Behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates he or she would pose a risk of harm if they work regularly or closely with children.
  • Behaved or been involved in an incident outside of the setting which did not involve children but could impact on their suitability to work with children.

 

PROCEDURE IF ALLEGATION IS AGAINST A STAFF MEMBER

In dealing with allegations or concerns against an adult, staff must;

  • Report any concerns about the conduct of any member of staff, volunteer or other adult to the Headteacher immediately.
  • Once an allegation has been received the Headteacher will contact the Local authority designated officer for allegations, LADO (as part of their mandatory duty) on 

Telephone: 0300 123 1650

Select Option 3

Email: LADO@surreycc.gov.uk

      immediatey before taking any action or investigation.

  • The Headteacher in liaison with the LADO will consider the nature, content and context of the allegation and agree a course of action.
  • The Headteacher in liaison with the LADO will decide whether the alleged incident should be referred on to Social Services or the Police or no further action needs to be taken.
  • Following consulation with the LADO inform the parents of the allegation unless there is a good reason not to.
  • The case manager (Headteacher) will inform the accused person about the allegation as soon as possible after consulting with the LADO. They will be provided with as much information as possible at that time. However, where a strategy discussion is needed, or police, or children's social care services need to be involved, the case manager (Headteacher) should not do that until those agencies have been consulted, and have agreed what information can be disclosed to the accused.
  • The decision with reasoning will be clearly recorded.
  • The involvement of an LEA officer ensures that cases are dealt with impartially and help avoid any possible accusation of collusion.
  • If the matter is investigated internally, the LADO will advise the school to seek guidance from local authority colleagues in following procedures set out in part 4 of 'Keeping Children Safe in Education' (2021) and the SSCP Procedures.
  • The School will follow the framework set out in "Keeping Children Safe in Education" September 2021 at all times.
  • The School will promptly report to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) a staff member (Whether employed, contracted, a volunteer or student) whose services are no longer used for regulated activity and the DBS referral criteria are met, that is, they have caused harm or posed a risk of harm to a child.

 

PROCEDURE IF ALLEGATION IS AGAINST THE HEADTEACHER

 

  • Report any concerns about the conduct of the Headteacher to the Proprietor immediately.
  • Once an allegation has been received the Proprietor will contact the Local authority designated officer for allegations, LADO (as part of their mandatory duty) on 

Telephone: 0300 123 1650

Select Option 3

Email: LADO@surreycc.gov.uk

      immediatey before taking any action or investigation.

  • The Proprietor in liaison with the LADO will consider the nature, content and context of the allegation and agree a course of action.
  • The Proprietor in liaison with the LADO will decide whether the alleged incident should be referred on to Social Services or the Police or no further action needs to be taken.
  • Following consulation with the LADO inform the parents of the allegation unless there is a good reason not to.
  • The case manager (Proprietor) will inform the accused person about the allegation as soon as possible after consulting with the LADO. They will be provided with as much information as possible at that time. However, where a strategy discussion is needed, or police, or children's social care services need to be involved, the case manager (Proprietor) should not do that until those agencies have been consulted, and have agreed what information can be disclosed to the accused.
  • The decision with reasoning will be clearly recorded.
  • The involvement of an LEA officer ensures that cases are dealt with impartially and help avoid any possible accusation of collusion.
  • If the matter is investigated internally, the LADO will advise the school to seek guidance from local authority colleagues in following procedures set out in part 4 of 'Keeping Children Safe in Education' (2021) and the SSCP Procedures.
  • The School will follow the framework set out in "Keeping Children Safe in Education" September 2021 at all times.
  • The School will promptly report to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) a staff member (Whether employed, contracted, a volunteer or student) whose services are no longer used for regulated activity and the DBS referral criteria are met, that is, they have caused harm or posed a risk of harm to a child.

 

PROCEDURE IF ALLEGATION IS AGAINST THE PROPRIETOR

 

  • Report any concerns about the conduct of the Proprietor to the Headteacher immediately.
  • Once an allegation has been received the Headteacher will contact the Local authority designated officer for allegations, LADO (as part of their mandatory duty) on 

Telephone: 0300 123 1650

Select Option 3

Email: LADO@surreycc.gov.uk

      immediatey before taking any action or investigation.

  • The Headteacher in liaison with the LADO will consider the nature, content and context of the allegation and agree a course of action.
  • The Headteacher in liaison with the LADO will decide whether the alleged incident should be referred on to Social Services or the Police or no further action needs to be taken.
  • Following consulation with the LADO inform the parents of the allegation unless there is a good reason not to.
  • The case manager (Headteacher) will inform the accused person about the allegation as soon as possible after consulting with the LADO. They will be provided with as much information as possible at that time. However, where a strategy discussion is needed, or police, or children's social care services need to be involved, the case manager (Headteacher) should not do that until those agencies have been consulted, and have agreed what information can be disclosed to the accused.
  • The decision with reasoning will be clearly recorded.
  • The involvement of an LEA officer ensures that cases are dealt with impartially and help avoid any possible accusation of collusion.
  • If the matter is investigated internally, the LADO will advise the school to seek guidance from local authority colleagues in following procedures set out in part 4 of 'Keeping Children Safe in Education' (2021) and the SSCP Procedures.
  • The School will follow the framework set out in "Keeping Children Safe in Education" September 2021 at all times.
  • The School will promptly report to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) a staff member (Whether employed, contracted, a volunteer or student) whose services are no longer used for regulated activity and the DBS referral criteria are met, that is, they have caused harm or posed a risk of harm to a child.

 

 

The Headteacher has a continuing duty of care to any member of staff who becomes the subject of an allegation.

 

We aim to deal with any allegations of abuse made against a teacher,other member of staff, including supply staff, volunteers, Headteacher or Proprietor in the school as quickly, fairly and consistently as we can to provide effective protection for the child and at the same time support the person who is the subject of an allegation.

 

Consideration will also be given to making a referral to the Teaching Regulation Agency (TRA) where a teacher has been dismissed (or would have been dismissed had he/she not resigned) and a prohibition order may be appropriate. The reasons such an order would be considered are: 'unacceptable professional conduct', 'conduct that may bring the profession into disrepute', or a 'conviction, at any time, for a relevant offence'.

 

Advice about whether an allegation against a teacher is sufficiently serious to refer to the TRA can be found in Teacher misconduct: the prohibition of teachers (October 2018). Further guidance can be found on the TRA website.

 

Every effort will be made to maintain confidentiality and guard against unwanted publicity. These restrictions apply up to the point where the accused person is charged with an offence, or the DfE/TRA publish information about an investigation or decision in a disciplinary case.

 

A report will be made to OFSTED within 14 days if there is an allegation of serious harm or abuse by any person living, working or looking after children at the premises or elsewhere, or any other abuse on the premises.

 

Record-keeping

 

The case manager will maintain clear records about any case where the allegation or concern meets the criteria above and store them on the individual’s confidential personnel file for the duration of the case. 

The records of any allegation that, following an investigation, is found to be malicious or false will be deleted from the individual’s personnel file (unless the individual consents for the records to be retained on the file).

For all other allegations (which are not found to be malicious or false), the following information will be kept on the file of the individual concerned:

  • A clear and comprehensive summary of the allegation
  • Details of how the allegation was followed up and resolved
  • Notes of any action taken, decisions reached and the outcome 
  • A declaration on whether the information will be referred to in any future reference

In these cases, the school will provide a copy to the individual, in agreement with children’s social care or the police as appropriate.

Where records contain information about allegations of sexual abuse, we will preserve these for the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA), for the term of the inquiry. We will retain all other records at least until the individual has reached normal pension age, or for 10 years from the date of the allegation if that is longer.

 

References

 

When providing employer references, we will:

  • Not refer to any allegation that has been found to be false, unfounded, unsubstantiated or malicious, or any repeated allegations which have all been found to be false, unfounded, unsubstantiated or malicious
  • Include substantiated allegations, provided that the information is factual and does not include opinions

 

Learning lessons

 

After any cases where the allegations are substantiated, the case manager will review the circumstances of the case with the local authority’s designated officer to determine whether there are any improvements that we can make to the school’s procedures or practice to help prevent similar events in the future. 

This will include consideration of (as applicable):

  • Issues arising from the decision to suspend the member of staff
  • The duration of the suspension
  • Whether or not the suspension was justified 
  • The use of suspension when the individual is subsequently reinstated. We will consider how future investigations of a similar nature could be carried out without suspending the individual

For all other cases, the case manager will consider the facts and determine whether any improvements can be made.

 

Non-recent allegations

 

Abuse can be reported, no matter how long ago it happened.

We will report any non-recent allegations made by a child to the LADO in line with our local authority’s procedures for dealing with non-recent allegations.

Where an adult makes an allegation to the school that they were abused as a child, we will advise the individual to report the allegation to the police.

 

Section 2: Concerns that do not meet the harms threshold

 

This section applies to all concerns (including allegations) about members of staff, including supply teachers, volunteers and contractors, which do not meet the harm threshold set out in section 1 above.

Concerns may arise through, for example: 

  • Suspicion
  • Complaint
  • Disclosure made by a child, parent or other adult within or outside the school
  • Pre-employment vetting checks 

We recognise the importance of responding to and dealing with any concerns in a timely manner to safeguard the welfare of children.

 

DEFINITION OF LOW-LEVEL CONCERNS

The term ‘low-level’ concern is any concern – no matter how small – that an adult working in or on behalf of the school may have acted in a way that:

  • Is inconsistent with the staff code of conduct, including inappropriate conduct outside of work, and
  • Does not meet the allegations threshold or is otherwise not considered serious enough to consider a referral to the designated officer at the local authority

Examples of such behaviour could include, but are not limited to:

  • Being overly friendly with children
  • Having favourites
  • Taking photographs of children on their mobile phone
  • Engaging with a child on a one-to-one basis in a secluded area or behind a closed door
  • Using inappropriate sexualised, intimidating or offensive language

 

SHARING LOW-LEVEL CONCERNS 

We recognise the importance of creating a culture of openness, trust and transparency to encourage all staff to share low-level concerns so that they can be addressed appropriately.

We will create this culture by: 

  • Ensuring staff are clear about what appropriate behaviour is, and are confident in distinguishing expected and appropriate behaviour from concerning, problematic or inappropriate behaviour, in themselves and others
  • Empowering staff to share any low-level concerns
  • Empowering staff to self-refer 
  • Addressing unprofessional behaviour and supporting the individual to correct it at an early stage
  • Providing a responsive, sensitive and proportionate handling of such concerns when they are raised
  • Helping to identify any weakness in the school’s safeguarding system

 

RESPONDING TO LOW-LEVEL CONCERNS

If the concern is raised via a third party, the headteacher will collect evidence where necessary by speaking:

  • Directly to the person who raised the concern, unless it has been raised anonymously 
  • To the individual involved and any witnesses  

The headteacher will use the information collected to categorise the type of behaviour and determine any further action, in line with the school’s staff code of conduct.

 

RECORD KEEPING

All low-level concerns will be recorded in writing. In addition to details of the concern raised, records will include the context in which the concern arose, any action taken and the rationale for decisions and action taken. 

Records will be:

  • Kept confidential, held securely and comply with the DPA 2018 and UK GDPR
  • Reviewed so that potential patterns of concerning, problematic or inappropriate behaviour can be identified. Where a pattern of such behaviour is identified, we will decide on a course of action, either through our disciplinary procedures or, where a pattern of behaviour moves from a concern to meeting the harms threshold as described in section 1, we will refer it to the designated officer at the local authority 
  • Retained at least until the individual leaves employment at the school 

Where a low-level concern relates to a supply teacher or contractor, we will notify the individual’s employer, so any potential patterns of inappropriate behaviour can be identified.

 

REFERENCES 

We will not include low-level concerns in references unless:

  • The concern (or group of concerns) has met the threshold for referral to the designated officer at the local authority and is found to be substantiated; and/or
  • The concern (or group of concerns) relates to issues which would ordinarily be included in a reference, such as misconduct or poor performance

 

Whistle blowing

 

We recognise that children cannot be expected to raise concerns in an environment where staff fail to do so.

All staff, including temporary staff/supply staff and volunteers should be aware of their duty to raise concerns, where they exist, about the management of child protection, which may include the attitude or actions of colleagues, poor or unsafe practice or potential failures in the school’s safeguarding arrangements. If it becomes necessary to consult outside the school, they should speak in the first instance, to the Area Schools Officer or LADO in accordance with the Whistleblowing Policy.

The NSPCC whistle blowing helpline is available for staff who do not feel able to raise concerns regarding child protection failures internally or have concerns about a way a concern is being handled by their school. Staff can call: 0800 028 0285 - line is available from 8.00am to 8.00pm, Monday to Friday and Email: help@nspcc.org.uk.

Whistle blowing re the Headteacher should be made to the Proprietor whose contact details are readily available to staff.

 

Mental Health and Wellbeing

 

At Westward School we are committed to supporting the positive mental health and wellbeing of our whole community of children, staff, parents and carers.  

Our ethos is supportive, caring and respectful. We understand how important positive mental health and wellbeing is to our lives. We recognise that children’s mental health is a vital factor in their overall wellbeing and how it can affect their learning and achievements. Our School encourages children to be open and we support all children to have their voice heard. 

If staff have a mental health concern about a child that is also a safeguarding concern, immediate action should be taken, following the School's Child Protection and Safeguarding policy, and speaking to the designated safeguarding lead or a deputy.

Read the Mental Health and Wellbeing Policy for more detailed information.

 

 

 Allegations of abuse made against other pupils

 

 

We recognise that children are capable of abusing their peers. Abuse will never be tolerated or passed off as “banter”, “just having a laugh” or “part of growing up”, as this can lead to a culture of unacceptable behaviours and an unsafe environment for pupils.

We also recognise the gendered nature of peer-on-peer abuse. However, all peer-on-peer abuse is unacceptable and will be taken seriously. 

Most cases of pupils hurting other pupils will be dealt with under our school’s behaviour policy, but this child protection and safeguarding policy will apply to any allegations that raise safeguarding concerns. This might include where the alleged behaviour:

  • Is serious, and potentially a criminal offence
  • Could put pupils in the school at risk
  • Is violent
  • Involves pupils being forced to use drugs or alcohol
  • Involves sexual exploitation, sexual abuse or sexual harassment, such as indecent exposure, sexual assault, upskirting or sexually inappropriate pictures or videos (including the sharing of nudes and semi-nudes)

Peer-on-peer abuse

 

Peer-on-peer abuse is when children abuse other children. This type of abuse can take place inside and outside of school and online.  

Peer-on-peer abuse is most likely to include, but may not be limited to:

  • Bullying (including cyber-bullying, prejudice-based and discriminatory bullying)
  • Abuse in intimate personal relationships between peers
  • Physical abuse such as hitting, kicking, shaking, biting, hair pulling, or otherwise causing physical harm (this may include an online element which facilitates, threatens and/or encourages physical abuse)
  • Sexual violence, such as rape, assault by penetration and sexual assault (this may include an online element which facilitates, threatens and/or encourages sexual violence)
  • Sexual harassment, such as sexual comments, remarks, jokes and online sexual harassment, which may be standalone or part of a broader pattern of abuse
  • Causing someone to engage in sexual activity without consent, such as forcing someone to strip, touch themselves sexually, or to engage in sexual activity with a third party
  • Consensual and non-consensual sharing of nudes and semi nudes images and/or videos (also known as sexting or youth produced sexual imagery)
  • Upskirting, which typically involves taking a picture under a person’s clothing without their permission, with the intention of viewing their genitals or buttocks to obtain sexual gratification, or cause the victim humiliation, distress or alarm
  • Initiation/hazing type violence and rituals (this could include activities involving harassment, abuse or humiliation used as a way of initiating a person into a group and may also include an online element)

Where children abuse their peers online, this can take the form of, for example, abusive, harassing, and misogynistic messages; the non-consensual sharing of indecent images, especially around chat groups; and the sharing of abusive images and pornography, to those who don't want to receive such content.

If staff have any concerns about peer-on-peer abuse, or a child makes a report to them, they will follow the procedures set out below.

Procedures for dealing with allegations of peer-on-peer abuse

 

If a pupil makes an allegation of abuse against another pupil:

  • You must record the allegation and tell the DSL, but do not investigate it
  • The DSL will contact the local authority children’s social care team and follow its advice, as well as the police if the allegation involves a potential criminal offence
  • The DSL will put a risk assessment and support plan into place for all children involved (including the victim(s), the child(ren) against whom the allegation has been made and any others affected) with a named person they can talk to if needed
  • The DSL will contact the children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS), if appropriate

Creating a supportive environment in school and minimising the risk of peer-on-peer abuse

 

We recognise the importance of taking proactive action to minimise the risk of peer-on-peer abuse, and of creating a supportive environment where victims feel confident in reporting incidents. 

To achieve this, we will:

  • Challenge any form of derogatory or sexualised language or inappropriate behaviour between peers, including requesting or sending sexual images 
  • Be vigilant to issues that particularly affect different genders – for example, sexualised or aggressive touching or grabbing towards female pupils, and initiation or hazing type violence with respect to boys
  • Ensure our curriculum helps to educate pupils about appropriate behaviour and consent 
  • Ensure pupils are able to easily and confidently report abuse using our reporting systems
  • Ensure staff reassure victims that they are being taken seriously 
  • Ensure staff are trained to understand:
    • Children can show signs or act in ways they hope adults will notice and react to
    • A friend may make a report 
    • A member of staff may overhear a conversation 
    • A child’s behaviour might indicate that something is wrong
    • How to recognise the indicators and signs of peer-on-peer abuse, and know how to identify it and respond to reports
    • That even if there are no reports of peer-on-peer abuse in school, it does not mean it is not happening – staff should maintain an attitude of “it could happen here” 
    • That if they have any concerns about a child’s welfare, they should act on them immediately rather than wait to be told, and that victims may not always make a direct report. For example:
    • That certain children may face additional barriers to telling someone because of their vulnerability, disability, gender, ethnicity and/or sexual orientation
    • That a pupil harming a peer could be a sign that the child is being abused themselves, and that this would fall under the scope of this policy
    • The important role they have to play in preventing peer-on-peer abuse and responding where they believe a child may be at risk from it
    • That they should speak to the DSL if they have any concerns

 

Risk Assessment

Following a report the DSL will make an immediate risk and needs assessment on a case-by-case basis.

 

The Risk assessment will consider;

  • The victim, especially their protection and support.
  • The alleged perpetrator, their support needs and discipline action.
  • All other children at the school.
  • The victim and the alleged perpetrator sharing classes and space at school.
  • The risk assessment will be recorded and kept under review.

 

Where there has been other professional intervention and/or other specialist risk assessments, these professional assessments will be used to inform the school's approach to supporting and protecting pupils.

 

Support regarding risk assessments can be accessed from the Education Safeguarding Team - education.safeguarding@surreycc.gov.uk

 

Action: The DSL will consider:-

  • The wishes of the victim.
  • The nature of the incident including whether a crime has been committed and the harm caused.
  • Ages of the children involved.
  • Developmental stages of the children.
  • Any power imbalance between the children.
  • Any previous incidents.
  • Ongoing risks.
  • Other related issues or wider context.

 

Options: 

  • Manage internally
  • Early Help intervention
  • Request for support to the C-SPA
  • Report to the Police (generally in parallel with a request for support to the C-SPA)

 

Ongoing Response:

The DSL will manage each case individually and will ensure the risk assessment is reviewed regularly with relevant partner agencies, for example the Police and Children's Social Care.

 

Where there is a criminal investigation into a rape, assault by penetration or sexual assault, the alleged perpetrator should be removed from any classes they share with the victim.

 

The DSL will consider how best to keep the victim and perpetrator a reasonable distance apart on school premises and on transport where appropriate.

 

Where a criminal investigation into a rape or assault by penetration leads to a conviction or caution, the school will take suitable action. In all but the most exceptional circumstances, the rape or assault is likely to constitute a serious breach of discipline and may lead to the view that allowing the perpetrator to remain in the same school would seriously harm the education or welfare of the victim (and potentially themselves and other pupils).

 

Where a criminal investigation into sexual assault leads to a conviction or caution, the school will, if it has not already, consider any suitable sanctions in light of their behaviour policy, which may include consideration of permanent exclusion. Where the perpetrator is going to remain at the school, the Headteacher should continue keeping the victim and perpetrator in separate classes and continue to consider the most appropriate way to manage potential contact on school premises and transport. The nature of the conviction or caution and wishes of the victim will be especially important in determining how to proceed in such cases.

 

The victim, alleged perpetrator and any other affected children and adults will receive appropriate support and safeguards on a case-by-case basis.

 

The school will take any disciplinary action against the alleged perpetrator in accordance with the school behaviour policy.

 

The school recognises that taking disciplinary action and providing support are not mutually exclusive actions and will occur at the same time if necessary.

  

Harmful Sexual Behaviour

 

 The Brook Traffic Light Tool uses a traffic light system to categorise the sexual behaviours of young people and once Brook training has been undertaken it can be used to help professionals:

  • Make decisions about safeguarding children and young people
  • Assess and respond appropriately to sexual behaviour in children and young people
  • Understand healthy sexual development and distinguish it from harmful behaviour

 

By categorising sexual behaviours, school can work with other agencies to the same standardised criteria making decisions and can protect children and young people with a multi-agency approach.

 

The school recognises that it is vital that professionals agree on how behaviours should be categorised regardless of culture, faith, beliefs, and their own experiences or values.

Anti-Bullying/Cyberbullying

 

Our School Policy on anti-bullying is set out in a separate document and acknowledges that to allow or condone bullying may lead to consideration under child protection procedures.

 

We keep a record of known bullying incidents which is shared with and analysed by the Proprietor and/or members of the Advisory Board. All staff are aware that children with SEND and/or differences/perceived differences are more susceptible to being bullied/victims of child abuse.

 

When there is 'reasonable cause to suspect that a child is suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm' a bullying incident should be addressed as a child protection concern. If the anti-bullying procedures are seen to be ineffective, the Headteacher/DSL and Deputy DSL will also consider child protection procedures.

 

PSHE education at Westward regularly provides opportunities for children to understand bullying is wrong, its impact and how to deal with it.

 

Online Safety/Cybercrime

 

Online Safety is recognised as part of the School's safeguarding responsibilities.

 

The school has an online safety policy which explains how we try to keep pupils safe in school, the filtering and monitoring systems and how to respond to online safety incidents.

 

Children increasingly use electronic equipment on a daily basis to access the internet, share and view content and images via social media sites such as Facebook, twitter, Instagram, snapchat, TikTok and voodoo and for online gaming.

 

Some adults and other children use these technologies to harm children. The harm might range from sending hurtful or abusive texts or emails, to grooming and enticing children to engage in extremist or sexual behaviour such as webcam photography or face-to-face meetings.

 

Children may also be distressed or harmed by accessing inappropriate material such as pornographic websites or those which promote extremist behaviour, criminal activity, suicide or eating disorders.

 

Pupils are taught about online safety throughout the curriculum and all staff receive online safety training which is regularly updated.

 

The DSL will take lead responsibility for online safety supported by the school's online safety co-ordinator, Mr Evans.

 

Children with particular skill and interest in computing and technology may inadvertently or deliberately stray into cyber-dependent crime. If there are concerns about a child in this area, the DSL (or a deputy), will consider a referral into the Cyber Choices programme.

 

This programme aims to intervene when young people are at risk of committing, or being drawn into, low level cyber-dependent offences and divert them to a more positive use of their skills and interests.

 

Please refer to the School's Online Safety Policy for more detailed information regarding online safety.

 

Useful websites include;

The UK Safer Internet Centre

http://www.saferinternet.org.uk

CEOP, Thinkuknow website

http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk

National Education Network for guidance on e-security

http://www.nen.gov.uk

  

Sharing Nudes and Semi Nudes 

 

The practice of children sharing images and video via text message, email, social media or mobile messaging apps has become commonplace. However, this online technology has also given children the opportunity to produce and distribute sexual imagery in the form of photos and videos. Such imagery involving anyone under the age of 18 is unlawful.

 

Sharing Nudes and Semi-Nudes refers to both images and videos where;

  • A person under the age of 18 creates and shares sexual imagery of themselves with a peer under the age of 18.
  • A person under the age of 18 shares sexual imagery created by another person under the age of 18 with a peer under the age of 18 or an adult.
  • A person under the age of 18 is in possession of sexual imagery created by another person under the age of 18.

 

All incidents of this nature should be treated as a safeguarding concern and in line with the UKCCIS guidance Sharing nudes and semi-nudes:advice for education settings working with children and young people

 

Cases where sexual imagery of people under 18 has been shared by adults and where sexual imagery of a person of any age has been shared by an adult to a child is child sexual abuse and should be responded to.

 

If a member of staff becomes aware of an incident involving making or sharing nudes/semi-nudes, they should follow the child protection procedures and refer to the DSL immediately.

 

The member of staff should confiscate the device involved and set it to flight mode or, if this is not possible, turn it off. Staff should not view, copy or print the youth produced sexual imagery.

 

The DSL should hold an initial review meeting with appropriate school staff and subsequent interviews with the children involved (if appropriate).

 

Parents should be informed at an early stage and involved in the process unless there is reason to believe that involving parents would put the child at risk of harm.

 

At any point in the process if there is concern a young person has been harmed or is at risk of harm a request for support should be made to the C-SPA or the Police as appropriate.

 

Immediate request for support at the initial review stage should be made to Children’s Social Care/Police if;

  • The incident involves an adult;
  • There is good reason to believe that a young person has been coerced, blackmailed or groomed or if there are concerns about their capacity to consent (for example, owing to special educational needs);
  • What you know about the imagery suggests the content depicts sexual acts which are unusual for the child’s developmental stage or are violent;
  • The imagery involves sexual acts;
  • The imagery involves anyone aged 12 or under;
  • There is reason to believe a child is in immediate risk of harm owing to the sharing of the imagery, for example the child is presenting as suicidal or self-harming.

 

If none of the above apply then the DSL will use their professional judgement to assess the risk to pupils involved and may decide, with input from the Deputy DSL’s and/or e-safety officer, to respond to the incident without referral to the C-SPA or the Police.

 

In applying judgement the DSL will consider if;

  • There is a significant age difference between the sender/receiver;
  • There is coercion or encouragement beyond sender/receiver;
  • The imagery was shared and received with the knowledge of the child in the imagery;
  • The child is more vulnerable, for example subject to Child in Need, Child Protection or Early Help plans, Looked After, SEND.
  • There is significant impact on the children involved;
  • The image is of a severe or extreme nature;
  • The child involved understands consent;
  • The situation is isolated or if the image has been more widely distributed;
  • There are other circumstances relating to either the sender or recipient that may add cause for concern.
  • The children have been involved in incidents related to youth produced imagery previously.

 

If any of these circumstances are present the situation will be referred according to our child protection procedures, including referral to the C-SPA or the Police.

 

The DSL will record all incidents of youth produced sexual imagery, including the actions taken, rationale for actions and the outcome.

 

Racist Incidents

 

Our policy on racist incidents is set out separately, and acknowledges that repeated racist incidents or a single serious incident may lead to consideration under child protection procedures. We keep records of racist incidents.

 

Radicalisation, Extremism and Terrorism

 

The Prevent Duty for England and Wales (2015) under section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 places a duty on education and other children’s services to have due regard to the need to prevent people being drawn into terrorism.

 

Extremism is defined as ‘vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of the law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs’. We also include in our definition of extremism calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas.

 

Terrorism is an action that endangers or causes serious violence to a person/people; causes serious violence to a person/people; causes serious damage to property; or seriously interferes with an electronic system. The use of threat must be designed to influence government or to intimidate the public and is made for the purpose of advancing a political, religious or ideological cause.

 

Some children are at risk from being radicalised; adopting beliefs and engaging in activities which are harmful, criminal or dangerous. This can happen both online and offline.

 

Westward School is clear that exploitation of vulnerable children and radicalisation should be viewed as a safeguarding concern and follows the Department of Education guidance for schools and childcare providers on preventing children and young people from being drawn into terrorism.

 

Westward School seeks to protect children and young people against the messages of all violent extremism including but not restricted to, those linked to Islamist ideology, or to Far Right/Neo Nazi/ White Supremacist ideology, Irish Nationalist and Loyalist paramilitary groups, and extremist Animal Rights movements.

 

School staff receive training to help identify early signs of radicalisation and extremism.

 

Opportunities are provided in the curriculum to enable pupils to discuss issues of religion, ethnicity and culture and the school follows the DfE advice Promoting Fundamental British Values as part of SMSC (spiritual, moral, social and cultural education) in Schools (2014).

 

The Proprietor, members of the Advisory Board, the Headteacher and the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) will assess the level of risk within the school and put actions in place to reduce that risk. Risk assessment may include, due diligence checks for external speakers and private hire of the school premises by external agencies, anti-bullying policy and other issues specific to the school’s profile, community and philosophy.

 

When any member of staff has concerns that a pupil may be at risk of radicalisation or involvement in terrorism, they should speak with the DSL in the first instance. They should then follow the safeguarding procedures and refer cases by email to preventreferrals@surrey.pnn.police.uk following the Prevent referral process and use the Prevent referral form. If the matter is urgent then Surrey Police must be contacted by dialling 999.  In cases where further advice from the Police is sought dial 101 or 01483 632982 and ask to speak to the Prevent Supervisor for Surrey.

 

The Department of Education has also set up a dedicated telephone helpline for staff to raise concerns around Prevent (0207 340 7264).

 

INDICATORS OF VULNERABILITY TO RADICALISATION

 

Radicalisation refers to the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and forms of extremism leading to terrorism.

 

Extremism is defined by the Crown Prosecution Service as:

  • The demonstration of unacceptable behaviour by using any means or medium to express views which:
  • Encourage, justify or glorify terrorist violence in furtherance of particular beliefs
  • Seek to provoke others to terrorist acts
  • Encourage other serious criminal activity or seek to provoke others to serious criminal acts
  • Foster hatred which might lead to inter-community violence in the UK.

 

There is no such thing as a “typical extremist”: those who become involved in extremist actions come from a range of backgrounds and experiences, and most individuals, even those who hold radical views, do not become involved in violent extremist activity.

Children may become susceptible to radicalisation through a range of social, personal and environmental factors - it is known that extremists exploit vulnerabilities in individuals to drive a wedge between them and their families and communities. It is vital that school staff are able to recognise those vulnerabilities.

 

Indicators of vulnerability include:

  • Identity Crisis - the child is distanced from their cultural/religious heritage and experiences discomfort about their place in society;
  • Personal Crisis - the child may be experiencing family tensions; a sense of isolation; and low self esteem; they may have dissociated from their existing friendship group and become involved with a new and different group of friends; they may be searching for answers to questions about identity, faith and belonging;
  • Personal Circumstances - migration;local community tensions; and events affecting the student/pupil’s country or region of origin may contribute to a sense of grievance that is triggered by personal experience of racism or discrimination or aspects of Government policy;
  • Unmet Aspirations - the child may have perceptions of injustice; a feeling of failure; rejection of civic life;
  • Experiences of Criminality - which may include involvement with criminal groups, imprisonment, and por resettlement/reintegration;
  • Special Educational Needs - children may experience difficulties with social interaction, empathy, with others, understanding the consequences of their actions and awareness of the motivation of others.

 

However, this list is not exhaustive, nor does it mean that all young people experiencing the above are at risk of radicalisation for the purposes of violent extremism. The Department of Education guidance The Prevent Duty should be referred to.

 

 

Domestic Abuse

 

Domestic abuse is actual or threatened physical, emotional, psychological or sexual abuse. It involves the use of power and control by one person over another. It occurs regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, age, religion, mental or physical ability. Domestic abuse can also involve other types of abuse.

 

The Domestic Abuse Act 2021 received Royal Assent on 29 April 2021. The Act introduces the first ever statutory definition of domestic abuse and recognises the impact domestic abuse on children, as victims in their own right, if they see, hear or experience the effects of abuse. The statutory definition of domestic abuse, based on the previous cross-government definition, ensures that different types of relationships are captured, including ex-partners and family members. The definition captures a range of different abusive behaviours, including physical, emotional and economic abuse and coercive and controlling behaviour. Both the person who is carrying out the behaviour and the person whom the behaviour is directed towards must be 16 or over and they must be "personally connected" (as defined in section 2 of the 2021 Act).

 

We use the term domestic abuse to reflect that several abusive and coercive controlling behaviours are involved beyond violence. Slapping, punching, kicking, bruising, rape, ridicule, constant criticism, threats, manipulation, sleep deprivation, social isolation, and other coercive controlling behaviours all count as abuse. Living in a home where domestic abuse takes place is harmful to children and can have a serious impact on their behaviour, wellbeing and understanding of healthy, positive relationships. Children who witness domestic abuse are at risk of significant harm and staff are alert to the signs and symptoms of a child suffering or witnessing domestic abuse. Staff undertake Domestic abuse e-learning training.

 

The School is enrolled onto the Operation Encompass scheme, a joint project between Surrey Police, Surrey Domestic Abuse Service and Surrey Schools; where every school day our DSL is notified of all domestic abuse incidents that have occurred and been reported to Police in the previous 24 hours which involved a pupil at this school (72 hours on a Monday morning). This provides an opportunity for us to ensure the right support is in place at the right time for our pupils who are experiencing domestic abuse. 

  

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

 

Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse.

 

It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into sexual activity (a) in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or (b) for the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator or facilitator.

 

The victim may have been sexually exploited even if the sexual activity appears consensual. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can occur through the use of technology. All staff are aware of the link between online safety and vulnerability to CSE.

 

Any concerns that a child is being or is at risk of being sexually exploited should be passed immediately to the DSL.

 

Westward School is aware there is a clear link between regular non attendance at school and CSE. Staff should consider a child to be at potential CSE risk in the case of regular non-attendance and make reasonable enquiries with the child and parents to assess this risk.

 

All staff are aware that safeguarding incidents and/or behaviours can be associated with factors outside of school or college and/or can occur between children outside of these environments. All staff, but especially the designated safeguarding lead (and deputies) will consider whether children are at risk from abuse or exploitation in situations outside their families. Extra-familial harms take a variety of different forms and children can be vulnerable to multiple harms including (but not limited to) sexual exploitation, criminal exploitation, and serious youth violence.

 

The DSL will consider the published Surrey Safeguarding Children Partnership guidance and advice when there is a concern that a child is being or is at risk of being sexually exploited or where indicators have been observed that are consistent with a child who is being or who is at risk of being sexually exploited.

 

In all cases if the tool identified any level of concern (green, amber or red) the DSL should contact the C-SPA and email a Request for Support Form. If a child is in immediate danger the Police should be called on 999.

 

Westward School is aware that a child often is not able to recognise the coercive nature of the abuse and does not see themselves as a victim. As a consequence the child may resent what they perceive as interference by staff. However, staff must act on their concerns as they would for any other type of abuse. Children rarely  self-report CSE so staff must be particularly vigilant to potential risk indicators.

 

Westward School includes the risks of sexual exploitation in the PSHE and RSE curriculum. Children will be informed of the grooming process and how to protect themselves from people who may potentially be intent on causing harm. They will be supported in terms of recognising and assessing risk in relation to CSE, including online, and knowing how and where to get help.

  

Child Criminal Exploitation and Gangs

 

Both CSE and CCE are forms of abuse and both occur when an individual or group takes advantage of an imblance in power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child into sexual or criminal activity.

 

There are a number of areas in which young people are put at risk by gang activity, both through participation in, and as victims of, gang violence which can be in relation to their peers or to a gang-involved adult in their household.

 

A child who is affected by gang activity or serious youth violence may have suffered, or may be likely to suffer, significant harm through physical, sexual and emotional abuse or neglect.

 

Children can be particularly vulnerable to recruitment into gangs and involvement in gang violence. This vulnerability may be exacerbated by risk factors in an individual's background, including violence in the family, involvement of siblings in gangs, poor educational attainment, or poverty or mental health problems.

 

Criminal exploitation of children is a typical feature of county lines criminal activity. Key identifying features of involvement in county lines are when children are missing, when the victim may have been trafficked for transporting drugs, a referral to the National Referral Mechanism should be considered with Social Care and Police colleagues.

 

A child who is affected by gang activity, criminal exploitation or serious youth violence can be at risk of significant harm through physical, sexual and emotional abuse. Girls may be particularly at risk of sexual exploitation.

 

Any concerns that a child is being or is at risk of being criminally exploited will be passed without delay to the DSL. The school is aware there is a clear link between regular non-attendance at school and exploitation. Staff will consider a child to be at potential risk in the case of regular non-attendance at school and make reasonable enquiries with the child and parents to assess this risk.

 

A request for support to the C-SPA will be made when any concern of harm to a child as a consequence of gang activity including child criminal exploitation becomes known. The DSL will contact the C-SPA. If there is a concern about a child's immediate safety, the Police will be contacted on 999.

 

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

 

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is illegal in England and Wales under the FGM Act (2003). It is a form of child abuse and violence against women. A mandatory duty requires teachers to report 'known' cases of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in under 18's, which are identified in the course of their professional work, to the Police.

 

The duty applies to all persons in Westward School who are employed or engaged to carry out 'teaching work' in the School, whether or not they have qualified teaching status.

 

The duty applies to the individual who becomes aware of the case to make a report. It should not be transferred to the Designated Safeguarding Lead, however the DSL should be informed.

 

If a teacher is informed by a girl under 18 that an act of FGM has been carried out on her or a teacher observes physical signs which appear to show that an act of FGM has been carried out on a girl under 18 and they have no reason to believe the act was necessary for the girl's physical or mental health or for the purposes connected with labour or birth, the teacher should personally make a report to the police force in which the girl resides by calling 101. The report should be made immediately.

 

School staff are trained to be aware of risk indicators of FGM.

Concerns about FGM outside of the mandatory reporting duty should be reported as per Westward School's child protection procedures. Staff should be particularly alert to suspicions or concerns expressed by female children about going on a long holiday during the summer holiday.

 

There should be consideration of potential risk to other girls in the family and the wider community. Where there is risk to life or serious immediate harm the teacher should report the case immediately to the Police, including calling 999 if appropriate.

 

There are no circumstances in which a teacher or other member of staff should examine a girl.

 

Female Genital Mutilation the Facts (March 2019)

 

Forced Marriage

 

A forced marriage is a marriage in which one or both people do not (or in cases of people with learning disabilities cannot) consent to the marriage but are coerced into it. Coercion may include physical, psychological, financial, sexual and emotional pressure. It may also involve physical or sexual violence or abuse.

 

Forced marriage is recognised in the UK as a form of violence against women and men, domestic/child abuse and a serious abuse of human rights. Since June 2014 forcing someone to marry has become a criminal offence in England and Wales under the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

 

A forced marriage is not the same as an arranged marriage which is common in many cultures. The families of both spouses take a leading role in arranging the marriage but the choice of whether or not to accept the arrangement remains with the prospective spouses.

 

School staff should never attempt to intervene directly as a school or through a third party. Contact should be made with the C-SPA and/or the Forced Marriage Unit 200 7008 0151.

 

Honour-based Abuse

 

Honour based abuse (HBA) can be described as a collection of practices, which are used to control behaviour within families or other social groups to protect perceived cultural and religious beliefs and/or honour. Such violence can occur when perpetrators perceive that a relative has shamed the family and/or community by breaking their honour code.

 

Honour based abuse might be committed against people who;

  • Become involved with a boyfriend or girlfriend from a different culture or religion;
  • Want to get out of an arranged marriage; become involved with a boyfriend or girlfriend from a different culture or religion;
  • Want to get out of a forced marriage;
  • Wear clothes or take part in activities that might not be considered traditional within a particular culture.

It is considered a violation of human rights and may be a form of domestic and/or sexual abuse. 

 

Contextual Safeguarding

 

Safeguarding incidents and/or behaviours can be associated with factors outside of school and/or can occur between children outside the school. All staff at Westward School have considered the context within which such incidents and/or behaviours occur. This is known as contextual safeguarding, which simply means assessments of children should consider whether wider environmental factors are present in a child's life that are a threat to their safety and/or welfare. During the referral process as much information as possible will be shared. This will allow any assessment to consider all the available evidence and the full context of any abuse.

 

One Chance Rule

 

All staff are aware of the ‘One Chance Rule’ in relation to forced marriage, FGM and HBA. Staff recognise they may only have one chance to speak to a child who is a potential victim and have just one chance to save a life.

 

Westward School are aware that if the victim is not offered support following disclosure that the ‘One Chance’ opportunity may be lost. Therefore, all staff are aware of their responsibilities and obligations when they become aware of forced marriage, FGM and HBA cases.

 

Private Fostering Arrangements

 

A private fostering arrangement occurs when someone other than a parent or close relative cares for a child for a period of 28 days or more, with the agreement of the child’s parents. It applies to children under the age of 16 or 18 if the child is disabled.

 

Looked  After Children by the local authority or who are placed in residential schools, children’s homes or hospitals are not considered to be privately fostered.

 

Private fostering occurs in all cultures and children may be privately fostered at any age.

 

Westward School recognises that most privately fostered children remain safe and well but are aware that safeguarding concerns have been raised in some cases. Therefore, all staff are alert to possible safeguarding issues, including the possibility that the child has been trafficked into the country.

 

By law, a parent, private foster carer or other persons involved in making a private fostering arrangement must notify Children's Social Care immediately. However, where a member of staff becomes aware that a pupil may be in a private fostering arrangement they will raise this with the DSL and the DSL will notify the C-SPA immediately.

 

Children Looked After

 

The most common reason for children becoming looked after is as a result of abuse and neglect.

 

The school ensures that staff have the necessary skills and understanding to keep looked after children safe. Appropriate staff have information about a child’s looked after legal status and care arrangements, including the level of authority delegated to the carer by the authority looking after the child and contact arrangements with birth parents or those with parental responsibility.

 

The designated teacher for children looked after will have the appropriate level training to equip them with the knowledge and skills to undertake their role.

 

The designated teacher for children looked after and the DSL have details of the child’s social worker and the name and contact details of the Surrey County Council’s Head of Virtual School.

 

The designated teacher for children looked after and children previously looked after will work in partnership with the Virtual School Assistant Headteacher to discuss how Pupil Premium Plus funding can be best used to support the progress of children looked after in the school and meet the needs of the child’s within their personal education plan.

 

Children Missing Education

 

 All children are entitled to an efficient, full time education which is suitable to their age, ability, aptitude and any special educational needs they may have.

 

The school recognises that children missing education, can be a vital warning sign of a range of safeguarding possibilities. They are also at significant risk of underachieving, being victims of abuse and harm, exploitation, radicalisation, and not being in education, employment or training (NEET) later in life.

 

Where possible the school will hold more than one emergency contact number for each pupil.

 

The school will ensure that there is a record of joiners and leavers as defined in The Education (Pupil Registration) (England) 2006 (amended 2016).

 

When removing a child’s name, the school will notify the Local Authority of: (a) the full name of the child, (b) the full name and address of any parent with whom the child normally resides, (c) at least one telephone number of the parent, (d) the child’s future address and destination school, if applicable, and (e) the ground in regulation 8 under which the child’s name is to be removed from the school register.

 

The school will make reasonable enquiries to establish the whereabouts of a child jointly with the Local Authority, before deleting the child’s name from the school register if the deletion is under regulation 8(1), sub-paragraphs (f) (iii) and (h) (iii)of The Education (Pupil Registration) (England) 2006.

 

The school will:

  • Enter children on the admissions register on the first day on which the school has agreed, or has been notified, that the pupil will attend the school.
  • Notify the Local Authority within five days of adding a child’s name to the admission register. The notification must include all the details contained in the admission register for the new pupil.
  • Monitor each child’s attendance through their daily register and follow the SCC procedure in cases of unauthorised absence.
  • Remove a child’s name from the admissions register on the date that the child leaves the school.
  • The school will notify the Local Authority when they are about to remove a child’s name from the school register under any of the fifteen grounds listed in the regulations, no later than the date that the child’s name is due to be removed.
  • Where parents notify the school, in writing, of their intention to Electively Home Educate (EHE) the school will forward a copy of the letter to the Local Authority Education Inclusion Team.
  • Where parents orally indicate that they intend to withdraw their child to EHE and no letter has been received, the school will not remove the child from roll and will notify the Education Inclusion Team at the earliest opportunity.

 

Pupils Missing Out On Education

 

Most children engage positively with school and attend regularly.  However, to flourish, some children require an alternative education provision or may require a modified timetable to support a return to full time education provision. It is recognised that children accessing alternative provision or a reduced or modified timetable may have additional vulnerabilities. Ofsted refer to these as Pupils Missing Out On Education (PMOOE), because they are not accessing their education in school in the ‘usual way’.

 

The school will gain consent (if required in statute) from parents to put in place alternative provision and/or a reduced or modified timetable

 

The school will ensure that and parents (and the Local Authority where the child has an EHCP) are given clear information about alternative provision placements and reduced or modified timetables: why, when, where, and how they will be reviewed;

 

The school will keep the placement and timetable under review and involve parents in the review. Reviews will be frequent enough to provide assurance that the off-site education and/or modified timetable is achieving its objectives and that the pupil is benefitting from it;

 

The school will monitor and track children attending alternative provision to ensure that the provision meets the needs of the child

 

The school will comply with regular data returns requested by the Local Authority, regarding all pupils, of statutory school age, attending alternative provision and/or on a reduced or modified timetable.

 

The  senior management team will report to the Proprietor of  any formal direction of a child to alternative provision to improve behaviour.

 

The senior management team will report to the proprietors information regarding the use and effectiveness of the use of alternative provision and modified timetables.

 

School Attendance and Behaviour

 

Additional policies and procedures are in place regarding school attendance and behaviour.

 

The school recognises that absence from school and exclusion from school may be indicators of abuse and neglect, including the exploitation of children. The DSL will regularly liaise with members of school staff with responsibility for behaviour and attendance to ensure risk is identified and appropriate intervention is in place to protect children from harm.

 

The school will work in partnership with Surrey Police and other partners for reporting children that go missing from the school site during the school day. Staff will be alert to signs of children at risk of travelling to conflict zones, female genital mutilation and forced marriage.

 

Behaviour Policy

 

Exclusions Policy

 

Attendance Policy

 

Missing Child Policy

 

Use of Mobile Phones and Cameras

 

We have a clear policy in the EYFS, Out of School Care and main school on the acceptable use of mobile phones and cameras.

 

The following rules apply for the use of personal mobile phones;

Pupils

  • Pupils are not permitted to bring mobile phones, smart watches or personally owned devices into school.
  • Pupils in Year 6 who have been given permission by the Headteacher to walk home from school must sign in their mobile phones at the school office when they arrive in the morning, for safe-keeping in a locked location in the office during school hours.
  • Pupils must sign their phone out just before they leave the premises at the end of the school day.
  • If a pupil breaches the school policy then the phone or device will be confiscated and will be held in a secure place in the school office. Mobile phones and devices will be released to parents or carers in accordance with school policy.

Staff

  • The school accepts that employees will bring their mobile phones to work.
  • Mobile phones and personally owned devices brought into school are the responsibility of the device owner. The school accepts no responsibility for the loss, theft or damage of personally owned mobile phones or mobile devices.
    • Employees are not permitted to make/receive calls/texts during lessons or formal school time or use recording equipment on their mobile phones or personal devices to take photographs/videos of children.
    • Staff use of mobile phones during the school day will normally be limited to the morning/lunch break and after school.
    • Mobile phones should be switched off (or silent) and left in a safe place during lesson times. Staff should use phones in designated areas. The designated area is the Staff Room. If a private call needs to be made then a request for a room can be made to the Headteacher.
  • Mobile phones are not permitted in areas where children are present.
  • In the event that an employee has a particular reason for a specified period of time, they may request via the Headteacher that they leave their phone on during working hours.
  • If a staff member breaches the school policy then disciplinary action may be taken as appropriate.
  • Staff should ensure that their phones are protected with PIN/access codes in case of loss or theft.
  • Mobile phones should not be used in a space where children are present unless the School phone is being used for a medical reason, Out of School Care or the teacher is in a remote location such as at St Andrew's Hall, Xcel Leisure Centre or on a class outing.

Please refer to the School's Social Media Policy for more detailed information regarding the use of mobile technology such as the use of mobiles and cameras.

You can access guidance and practical support by clicking on the links provided below;

 

Expert and professional organisations are best placed to provide up to date guidance and practical support on specific safeguarding issues such as child sexual exploitation (CSE), bullying including cyber bullying, domestic violence, drugs, fabricated or induced illness, faith abuse, female genital mutilation (FGM), forced marriage, gangs and youth violence, gender-based and honour based violence/violence against women and girls (VAWG), breast ironing (BI)), mental health, private fostering, preventing radicalisation and extremism, sexting, teenage relationship abuse, trafficking and disguised compliance.

 

NSPCC

http://www.nspcc.org.uk

Government website

http://www.gov.uk

(Type the topic you require guidance and support for into the search box)

Other useful sites include;

http://www.familylives.org.uk

http://www.kidscape.org.uk

http://www.childline.org

http://www.youngminds.org.uk

 

 Restrictive Physical Intervention

 

We acknowledge that staff must only ever use physical intervention as a last resort, when a child is or at immediate risk of harming him/herself or others, and that at all times it must be the minimal force necessary to prevent injury to another person. Such events should be fully recorded and signed by a witness.

 

Staff who are likely to need to use physical intervention will be appropriately trained in Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI) techniques.

 

Staff understand that physical intervention of a nature which causes injury or distress to a child may be considered under child protection and/or disciplinary procedures.

 

We recognise that sometimes touch is appropriate in the context or working with children, and all staff have been given ‘Safe Practice’ guidance to ensure they are clear about their professional boundaries.

 

When applying disciplinary measures such as physical intervention or isolation for children with SEND the school will consider the risks, given the additional vulnerabilities of these children.

 

Surrey County Council guidance Touch and the use of restrictive Physical Intervention When Working with Children and Young People provides further detailed information.

 

COVID - 19  School Closure arrangements for Safeguarding and Child Protection at Westward School

 

 

 

 

Remote Learning Agreements for Teachers, Parents and Pupils

 

All users must sign the remote learning agreements.

 

All remote learning will take place within the secure wwsch.net platform which is monitored on a daily basis.

 

Remote Learning at Westward - Teacher Protocols

 

Remote learning at Westward School during any enforced part or full school closure or while pupils are self isolating will ensure that we stay connected with the school community. It will not only allow the learning process to continue but will also provide important support for pupil well being.

 

The platform that should be used for all remote sessions is the Google Meet app via the wwsch.net system. Details about each remote learning session and any support material/s can be posted within the Google Classroom. It is important to get the pupils into the habit of opening up the Google Classroom every morning so they can keep up to date with posted lessons and activities that they have been asked to complete and then hand in.

 

Google Meet can be used for:

 

  • Class teaching
  • Review and Feedback
  • Pastoral check-ins
  • Group Reading Sessions
  • Assemblies

 

To create a safe environment for our pupils when engaging in remote sessions, there are several things that a teacher should consider.

 

  • We must have consent from parents/carers to access the remote learning sessions. Consent will be gained by the parents/carers completing the ‘Parent Consent Form for Remote Learning Sessions’.
  • Pupils will also be required to sign a ‘Remote Learning Responsible Use Agreement’.
  • Teachers should familiarise themselves with the functions of the Google Meet app, including the mute settings.
  • Any remote sessions should take place during school hours and must be hosted and supervised by the class teacher.
  • Each class teacher must share their proposed remote learning timetables with the Headteacher.
  • Teachers need to consider and be sensitive to the needs of individual pupils, and children who may be sensitive to certain topics or issues that may arise during the remote sessions.
  • When a remote session is finished, the pupils should exit the Google Meet app first, and the teacher should close the meet once complete. Say goodbye to each pupil and ensure they have ended the call.

 

Essential Rules

  • Have a minimum of three children in each remote session.
  • The first session should be on protocols and parameters of remote learning and after that, the first few minutes of each remote session should be a brief reminder of the expectations, rules and regulations which keep children and teachers safe online.
  • Remote sessions should take place during school hours.
  • Schedule Google Meet sessions through the Google Classroom calendar.
  • Video conference from an environment that is quiet, safe, with a neutral background and free from distractions.
  • Ensure you are in professional dress.
  • Keep a record of attendance.
  • Teachers should communicate with the Headteacher or DSL should any interactions not be appropriate or conducive to learning.
  • The School’s Safeguarding and Staff Code of Conduct must be adhered to at all times, this includes sessions that may need to be delivered from home.

 

Parental Consent Form for Remote Learning Sessions

 

Remote learning at Westward School during any enforced part or full school closure or while a pupil is self isolating will ensure that we stay connected as a school community. It will not only allow the learning process to continue but will also provide important support for pupil well being.

 

In the event of a return to remote learning you will receive a class timetable indicating the time of each remote learning session. Your child will be able to access the sessions through their secure wwsch.net account and the Google Meet and Classroom apps.

 

In order to deliver remote learning we must receive parental permission before a pupil is able to take part.

 

Pupils are expected to read and discuss the ‘Remote Learning Responsible Use Agreement’ with you, sign it and then follow the terms of the policy. Any concerns or queries can be discussed with the Headteacher.

 

To facilitate remote learning during part or full school closure, or if a child is self isolating, parents should support by:

  • Ensuring your child attends each remote learning session, completes and hands in any work set on time
  • Provide your child with a workspace with a neutral background that is quiet, safe and free from distractions with an adult nearby if necessary
  • Making sure your child is dressed appropriately
  • Ensuring that remote communication is only between teachers and pupils. Any parent to teacher communication should be in the usual manner, via email
  • Parents may not record, share or comment on public forums about individual teachers.

 

E-Safety Note - Please be aware any online interaction by your child, outside of the secure wwsch.net platform, is not monitored by the school and is therefore your responsibility.

 

By signing this form, you give permission for your child to attend remote learning sessions with Westward staff, acknowledge that you have shared the ‘Pupil Remote Learning Responsible Use Agreement’ and discussed remote learning with your child. It is vital that your child agrees to follow the rules.

 

We are here to support you every step of the way so please do make contact with either the class teacher or a member of the senior management team if you have any further questions or need any technical support. Staff members can be contacted during school hours via their wwsch.net email address. 

 

If you find that you do not have enough devices at home for your child/ren to take part in the remote learning sessions please do get in contact with the school office. We have a Chromebook Loan Scheme in place and will do our very best to accommodate any request.

 

 

Remote Learning Responsible User Agreement for Pupils

 

Remote learning at Westward School during any enforced part or full school closure or while pupils are self isolating will ensure that we stay connected as a school community. It will not only allow the learning process to continue but will also provide important support for pupil well being.

 

In the event of a return to remote learning you will receive a class timetable indicating the time of each remote learning session. You will be able to access the sessions through your secure wwsch.net account and the Google Meet and Classroom apps.

 

Rules

 

  • I will only use technology for school purposes as directed by my teacher.
  • I will only use technology when there is an adult in the house and they know I am using it.
  • I will not reveal my passwords to anyone.
  • I will be responsible for my behaviour and actions when using technology (Google Classroom, Google Meet and other interactive applications), this includes the resources I access and the language I use.
  • I will make sure that all my communication with pupils, teachers and others using technology is responsible and sensible.
  • I will not deliberately browse, download, upload or forward material that could be considered offensive or illegal. If I accidentally come across such material I will report it immediately to my teacher or my parents.
  • I will not record or take photos of my classmates or teachers during any remote learning session.
  • I understand that when using Google Classroom and other applications provided by the school that my use is monitored and logged and can be made available to my teachers.
  • I understand that these rules are designed to keep me safe and that if they are not followed, school sanctions will be applied and my parents may be contacted.



Guidelines

When using Google Meet and Classroom, remember that this is an extension of the classroom and you should conduct yourself as you would in the classroom. This includes:

 

  • Video conferencing from an environment that is quiet, safe and free from distractions, for example, not in bedrooms; and where possible be against a neutral background
  • Be on time for each remote learning session
  • Complete and hand in all work on time
  • Be dressed appropriately for learning (no pyjamas)
  • Put your microphone on mute at the start of each session and only unmute if instructed to do so by the teacher. Appropriate comments related to the learning objectives of the lesson can be made through the chat function when instructed to do so by the teacher
  • Only join each remote learning session 5 minutes before the start time (You will not be able to access the lesson until the teacher joins first) and ensure that you end the session when asked to do so by the teacher
  • Cameras should be turned on unless permission has been granted from the teacher prior to the session
  • Have all the equipment that you need for each session nearby such as your pencil case, textbook and exercise books
  • Remain attentive during sessions
  • Interact patiently and respectfully with your teachers and peers
  • Provide feedback to teachers about your experiences and any relevant suggestions
  • You MUST NOT record each other’s online interactions or film or share images of members of staff. It is illegal to share images of people without their consent

 

Check your Google calendar to keep up to date with remote learning sessions.